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>
>From: <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: CFP: Post-Colonial Cannibalism in Literature and the Arts 
>(9/15/06; NEMLA, 3/2/07-3/4/07)
>
>Post-Colonial Cannibalism in Literature and the Arts
>
>  A primary trope for interpreting cultural difference, the term 
>'cannibalism,' whether real or imagined, was repeatedly used by 
>imperial Europe in an effort to distinguish itself from the subjects 
>of its colonial expansion and justify the colonization of 
>territories. Through more recent theory, literature, and art, 
>cannibalism has also reappeared as a useful concept, trope, and 
>image to deconstruct and renegotiate identity, to explain cultural 
>processes and to draw new boundaries between the "self" and the 
>"Other." As a literary symbol, a tool, or a weapon, cannibalism 
>fosters reconsiderations, challenges hegemonic norms, and either 
>unsettles or displaces western cultural practices. This panel will 
>explore the construction of such a concept and how it has been used 
>in post-colonial literature and the arts.
>
>please send abstracts of 200 words by September 15, 2006 to Magali 
>Compan ([log in to unmask])

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