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I'm rereading Wordsworth's Prelude (1805) again, and my delight in it is
increasing. (I'd read it half a dozen times or more over the last 50
years and each time my response was something like blah: maybe it's best
when one is old?) Anyhow, I've come on a passage which baffles me,
vi.452-55 (1805), 523-28 (1850):

				That day we first
	Beheld the summit of Mount Blanc, and grieved
	To have a soulless image on the eye
	Which had usurped upon a living thought
	That never more could be.

What is he talking about here? Why is Mont Blanc a "soulless image," and
why should it grieve him and his Cambridge friend? Granted a mountain
doesn't have much soul, neither do lots of other things, so why the
point about it here? Is it made clear in some other poem by W at the
time? 

Carrol