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Peter Montgomery wrote:
> 
> Now that we have all that out of our systems, I would like to raise
> a question I raised before, and for which, as far as I can recall,
> I got no response:

> Why does Eliot have Lord Claverton face his mortal end under a
> beech tree?


This is an allusion to Dante's "Inferno" Canto XXIV where Dante and
Virgil meet Count Tutti di Frutti who also died under a beech tree
but by being torn apart by a supposedly friendly dog which was way
to aggressive in defending her litter (this allusion also being used
by Eliot in "Dans le Restaurant" and "The Waste Land".)  Anyway,
di Frutti summarizes his death with the well-known quote
(Longfellow translation): "Life's a beech, then you die."

Regards,
    Rick Parker