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Dear David,

You will be interested to know that there is increasing interest here in
English poets who have not been recognized as well as poets of Scotland,
and Wales.  Perhaps you know the series from the National Poetry
Foundation on "Man and Poet" or "Woman and Poet"?  That is the US
publisher of my edition on MacDiarmid.  And there is work by Keith Tuma
and Romana Huk on rethinking what we used to think were "the"
Modernists.

I don't know Nicholson's work, but I will be in Manchester in May to
hear Jacke Kay read, and now I will look for a copy.  Is it readily
available in bookstores there?
Cheers,
Nancy 

>>> [log in to unmask] 04/10/06 3:39 AM >>>
Dear Listers,
 
I'm researching the life and works of the above, and it's already very  
obvious that there will be many connections of all kinds with TSE. I
haven't  
established yet the depth or frequency of  the actual contacts my
subject  had with 
TSE, nor have I attempted any evaluation of literary  context /
stylistic 
influences, but here is an extract from the  biographical notes which
accompany 
his archived personal papers at the  University of Manchester [the
footnote (6) 
in the text refers to a specific item  of these]:
 
..............Just a year later his own first collection, Five Rivers, 
was 
published by Faber and Faber where T.S. Eliot was a director. Eliot,
whom  
Nicholson first met at the Faber offices in 1938, had had a great
influence on  
the formation of Nicholson's poetic style; he later commented that
'Eliot, to  
me, was not just the beginning of modern poetry, he was the beginning of
 
poetry.' 6 Five Rivers , containing poems in varied styles on themes 
such as 
Cumbria, the War, and religion, won the first Heinemann Prize for 
Poetry. Similar 
themes run through Nicholson's second collection, Rock Face,  published
by 
Faber in 1948. 
 
It's my profound opinion that Norman Nicholson's work deserves far
greater  
and wider recognition than it has so far been given: in part, this was
of his  
own making: for example, he remained all his life living and working
from in 
the  same house in which he was born in a very small and isolated
industrial 
town in  northern England and he had no university education at all.
Rather than 
me  ramble on any more about my subject, there's a most excellent web 
resource  (intended for schools) at:-
 
_http://www.cleo.net.uk/resources/displayframe.php?src=181/consultants_resourc
es%2F%2Fenglish%2Fnorman3%2Findex.html_ 
(http://www.cleo.net.uk/resources/displayframe.php?src=181/consultants_resources//english/norman3/index.html)
+
 
Any pointers or comments or opinions from  any List members regarding 
any of 
the above would be most welcome indeed.
 
Thank you and best regards to all.
 
David Boyd
Cumbria UK