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Perhaps a little about the background of mermiads would help:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mermaid

Remember Ulysses? Perhaps Prufrock could be called, Me-lysses.

Cheers,
Peter
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Dunja Seselja" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Saturday, April 29, 2006 7:19 PM
Subject: Re: 'The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock'


> Thanks for the reply, CR! I like your interpretation
> of that bit. It seems to be that the poem contains two
> opposite moments: one one hand, there is an everyday
> life, everyday language, everyday faces, everyday
> yellow smoke. On the other, there is this metaphysical
> burden of time and finiteness. It is interesting that
> the motive of Michelangelo serves as an opposition to
> the first "world" and at the same time it is an
> opposition Prufrock himself (according to your point
> on masculine figures). So maybe we have here the
> "self" which is (trying to be) over and above this
> distinction, and yet, does it dare? and yet, it is not
> Hamlet... Ahh, this is such a complex poem (and
> that's, I guess, what makes it so great) - no matter
> where you try to catch it, it always slips away (for
> example, I can't figure out this motive of mermaids).
> 
> Cheers!
> 
> Dunja
> 
> 
> --- cr mittal <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
> > Thanks for your comments, Dunja. I answer you first.
> >   Your pardon, Marcia. Dunja's is an easier
> > question. 
> >    
> >   I take the poem to be an internal monologue  --
> >   the poet talking to his own self.
> >    
> >   As for Michaelangelo being the topic of
> > conversation 
> >   among the women, please consider the lines:
> >    
> >   Let us go, through certain half-deserted streets,
> > The muttering retreats 
> > Of restless nights in one-night cheap hotels
> > And sawdust restaurants with oyster-shells
> > Streets that follow like a tedious argument 
> > Of insidious intent 
> > To lead you to an overwhelming question... 
> > Oh, do not ask, " What is it?" 
> > Let us go and make our visit. 
> >    
> >   You will observe that the ambience of the place
> > depicted here
> >   hardly indicates a place where artists, or
> > art-minded people, 
> >   would meet and discuss art. It underscores the
> > cheapness
> >   of the place.
> >    
> >   The talk about Michaelangelo (as glib as that of
> > Chopin,
> >   the Polish music maestro in 'Portrait'),
> > therefore, is nothing
> >   more than a sop to seduce a customer. 
> >    
> >   Yes, there's an ironic dimension to this repeated
> > harping on
> >   "Michaelangelo". (The italian sculptor made
> > masculine figures 
> >   of enviable virility and strength.) It's an ironic
> > dig at Prufrock's 
> >   emasculated body. No wonder, he becomes too
> > self-conscious 
> >   and suffers the shame of "wriggling on the wall"
> > like a worm. 
> >    
> >   ~ CR
> > 
> > 
> > Dunja Seselja <[log in to unmask]> wrote:  Hm,
> > interesting, CR. I don't know if I could agree
> > with that completely, have to think about it
> > first...
> > What confuses me a bit is the fact that the poem
> > brings with "Let us go then, you and I..." - that
> > line, as well as the last one, brings in the story
> > another person... so I've always had a feeling the
> > poem is related to the love between two persons, but
> > in the light of an "overwhelming question" - our
> > finiteness and time. 
> > By the way, what do you think about the lines "In
> > the
> > room the women come and go/ Talking of
> > Michelangelo"?
> > I guess this has an ironic flair (or maybe I'm
> > wrong?), but why exactly Michelangelo?
> > 
> > D.
> > 
> > --- cr mittal wrote:
> > 
> > > Thanks, Dunja, for raising what I believe to be
> > the
> > > core and crucial questions vis-a-vis this poem.
> > > Here're my perceptions:
> > > 
> > > why is the poem called "the love song of j. a.
> > > prufrock"?
> > > It's a love song of _J. Alfred Prufrock_,
> > > implying thereby that it is "his" love song,
> > > and it's not like a conventional romantic love
> > > song we're used to hearing.
> > > 
> > > what sort of love is that?
> > > It's not human love (love of a man or woman) in
> > > the conventional sense that he has in mind. His
> > love
> > > is "love of God" -- love of the Absolute Good --
> > of
> > > being in harmony
> > > with that principle of goodness and divinity that
> > > is deep within us.
> > > 
> > > and does it at all matter...? 
> > > To Prufrock, this is the only form of love that
> > > matters.
> > > The rest, if not inspired (or informed) by this,
> > > is meaningless.
> > > 
> > > Of course, what I say will make better/fuller
> > > sense if the poem is read/explicated
> > > in this light.
> > > 
> > > Regards.
> > > 
> > > ~ CR
> > > 
> > > 
> > > Dunja Seselja wrote:
> > > //What do you think, why is the poem called "the
> > > love
> > > song of j. a. prufrock"? what sort of love is
> > that?
> > > and does it at all matter...? //
> > > 
> > > Dunja
> > > 
> > > 
> > > 
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