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That was a longer way of putting it, not very satisfactory.
A paraphrastic study in a worn out academical fashion.

I much prefer Eliot's. Succinct and to the point.

P.
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Carrol Cox" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Monday, April 24, 2006 6:16 AM
Subject: Re: Of 'Usk' : The pub poet's riddle!


> "Rickard A. Parker" wrote:
> >
> >
> > Seeing his guest to the taxi, John asked, "Do you think Pound will ever
> > finish the Cantos?" "If he does," Eliot said enigmatically, with a
farewell
> > wave, "he will die."
>
> In retrospect it is possible to see that the Cantos were _never_ not
> finished. Draft of 30 Cantos was a complete poem. The first 41 Cantos
> (Draft + Eleven New Cantos) was also a complete poem, incorporating and
> changing the Draft of 30). And so on. That was the kind of poem that it
> was. Finished, complete, at each point, but capable of expansion into a
> new  but still complete poem. A musicologist back in the early '60s
> wrote an essay comparing the poem to a Fugue, which was always complete
> but always expandable.
>
> Carrol
>
>
> -- 
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