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"Rickard A. Parker" wrote:
> 
>
> Seeing his guest to the taxi, John asked, "Do you think Pound will ever
> finish the Cantos?" "If he does," Eliot said enigmatically, with a farewell
> wave, "he will die."

In retrospect it is possible to see that the Cantos were _never_ not
finished. Draft of 30 Cantos was a complete poem. The first 41 Cantos
(Draft + Eleven New Cantos) was also a complete poem, incorporating and
changing the Draft of 30). And so on. That was the kind of poem that it
was. Finished, complete, at each point, but capable of expansion into a
new  but still complete poem. A musicologist back in the early '60s
wrote an essay comparing the poem to a Fugue, which was always complete
but always expandable.

Carrol