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On Sat, Apr 29, 2006 at 06:27:19PM -0700, Peter Montgomery wrote:
> So who is the "you" to whom he is talking?

I didn't mean to leave this one hanging: the real world has been calling.  
But a gloss that makes "you" and "I" the same person--Prufrock himself--lets 
the otherwise gramatically difficult "I" make a little more sense, precisely 
by drawing the reader's attention to the "I" and its awkwardness.  It's a lot 
more interesting than if the line had just been "let me go, then", and 
there's an ambiguity which wouldn't exist were the line "let us go, then, you 
and me"...

I'll write more, but for now I'm tired out and verging on the incoherent and 
so I'm off to bed.

--George