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>From: "baral" <[log in to unmask]>
>
>Subject: CFP: Theory after Derrida (7/31/06; collection)
>
>                     Call for Papers for a volume on
>
>                            Theory After Derrida
>
>Jacques Derrida died on 8 October 2004. Controversies embraced him while
>alive even followed him after his death. An obituary of Derrida by Jonathan
>Kandell in the New York Times titled &#8220; Jacques Derrida, 
>Abstruse Theorist,
>Dies at 74&#8221;(10 October 2004) provoked unprecedented response 
>from academia
>across the USA. If controversies have a way of signifying something besides
>arguments and counter-arguments they certainly underline the importance of
>the person about whom they are made. With or without controversies, Derrida
>is certainly an extraordinary thinker, philosopher and theorist. His method
>of critical engagement called &#8220;deconstruction&#8221;, declared 
>many times dead by
>his critics, is alive and challenges us as it denaturalizes many of the
>hierarchies that Western philosophy and culture conceived as natural.
>Derrida defines deconstruction as &#8220;something which 
>happens&#8221; in an attempt
>to understand the slipperiness of any system, whether linguistic or
>cultural. As Terry Eagleton in his work Literary Theory
>maintains: &#8220;deconstruction is for him (Derrida) an ultimately political
>practice, an attempt to dismantle the logic by which a particular system of
>thought, and behind that a whole system of political structures and social
>institutions, maintains its force.&#8221;
>Not only Derrida challenges our ways of thinking but also our hitherto
>methods of critical inquiry. In doing so he exposes the lie behind binaries
>such as speech/writing, nature/culture, male/female, black/white,
>literature/criticism and so on that have shaped our world views in that a
>hegemonic centre is always already in place dominating/marginalizing
>the &#8220;other.&#8221; Although Derrida&#8217;s influence on 
>literary criticism is well
>known and many have practised his method of deconstruction; the roots of
>his thought are more philosophical than literary. Derrida&#8217;s 
>examination of
>philosophical foundations of human sciences both conceptual and historical
>is an important aspect of his thought. Heidegger among others has
>influenced him the most in his attempt to renovate philosophy that allowed
>him to examine fundamental matters of critical concern. However he has
>moved beyond Heidegger.
>
>A year after his death it is pertinent to explore not only the status of
>Derrida&#8217;s contribution as a thinker but also the status of 
>critical theory
>as such. Should we dismiss Derrida as a thinker who espoused an extreme
>form of relativism bordering on nihilism or has he something fundamental to
>contribute to the future of theory? This question also underlines the
>future of theory in a significant way. If we consider theory as an endless
>problematizing of our beliefs and practices, of our suspicion and mistrust
>then one may legitimately ask what is then its future? Could we say that
>our mistrust and suspicion possibly would cohabit with faith in visualizing
>a future? Could we suggest that deconstruction is not destruction but a
>possibility that doubts the present having faith in the future? As John D.
>Caputo maintains: &#8220;If there were no theory, there would be no 
>future, just
>the endless repetition of the same&#8230;What deconstruction will 
>have done, and
>the way that it will live on, after Derrida, after deconstruction itself,
>lies in its insistence on the future, on what is coming, and on the courage
>it takes to keep the future open.&#8221;
>
>It is time that we ponder over and reflect on Derrida&#8217;s legacy and the
>future of theory. Having in mind all these we propose to bring out a volume
>titled Theory After Derrida. We have not consciously prepared any thematic
>division for the volume, allowing the contributors the freedom the way they
>think of/about Derrida as a critical thinker, a philosopher and a theorist
>predicating their thoughts to the future of critical theory. We expect the
>volume to be out by March 2007.
>
>Last date for submission of articles: July 31st 2006. The articles should
>be sent through E-mail. If a hard copy is submitted a soft copy in Windows
>Word 98 or 2000 format should accompany it. Queries on the volume can be
>made from the editors.
>
>Editors:
>Kailash C. Baral
>R.Radhakrishnan
>Bichitrananda Ray
>
>Contact Addresses:
>
>Kailash C. Baral	       R.Radhakrishnan             
>Professor of English        Professor of English        
>  and Director		   Chair Asian-American Studies            
>CIEFL, NE Campus	   University of California, Irvine	 
>NEHU Permanent Complex	      300H,Krieger Hall	                   
>Shillong&#8211;793022,India	       Mail Code:6900	              
>Phone:91+364-2550065(O)	       Irvine,CA 92697
>       0919436117351(M)	           
>    
>E-Mail: [log in to unmask]	E-mail: [log in to unmask]
>              [log in to unmask]
>
>And
>Dr. B.N.Ray
>Reader, Department of Political Science
>Ramjas College
>University of Delhi, Maurice Nagar
>Delhi- 110007, India
>
>About the editors:
>
>Kaialsh C. Baral teaches English literature and is the Director of the
>Northeast Campus of the Central Institute of English and Foreign Languages
>(CIEFL) at Shillong. He has authored Sigmund Freud: A Study of His Theory
>of Art and Literature (1994) and edited Humanities and Pedagogy: Teaching
>of Humanities Today (2002), Interpretation of Texts: text, meaning and
>interpretation (2002) and Earth Songs: Stories from Northeast India (2005).
>He has co-edited Theory and Praxis: Curriculum, Culture and English Studies
>(2003), Reflections on Literature, Criticism and Theory (2004), U.R.Anantha
>Murthy&#8217;s Samskara: A Critical Reader (2005). His articles on critical
>theory, cultural studies and postcolonial literatures are published in
>India and abroad and also included in many anthologies.
>
>R. Radhakrishnan is Professor of English and Comparative Literature, and
>Chair of the Department of Asian American Studies at the University of
>California, Irvine. Author of  Diasporic Meditations: Between Home and
>Location (University of Minnesota Press, 1996), Theory in an Uneven World
>(Blackwell, 2003), and History, the Human, and the World Between
>(Forthcoming: Duke University Press, 2007), he is also the author of a
>volume of Tamil poems and translator of contemporary Tamil fiction into
>English besides having a number of publications in journals on critical
>theory, postcolonial and  Asian-American studies.
>
>Bichitrananada Ray teaches Political Science at Ramjas College, University
>of Delhi. He studied at the Universities of Delhi and Toronto, Canada. He
>has authored Tradition and Innovation in Indian Political Thought (1998),
>Critical Theory: The Marx-Marcuse Encounter (1999), Liberalism and the
>Communitarian Challenge (1999), edited John Rawls and the Agenda of Social
>Justice (2000), C.B. Macpherson and Liberalism (2004) and co-edited  
>Nietzsche After Hundred Years (2006). He works in the area of critical
>theory and is widely published.
>

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