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>
>From: Johannes Angermueller <[log in to unmask]>
>
>Subject: CFP: Revolutions: Concepts, Discourses, 
>Practices of Revolutionary Action of Our Time 
>(Germany) (4/15/06; 7/7/06-7/9/06)
>
>TRANSFORMA # 4
>
>4th Transdisciplinary Forum Magdeburg, Germany
>
>Revolutions: Concepts, Discourses, Practices of Revolutionary Action of
>Our Time
>
>July 07-09, 2006
>
>Revolution: Few terms have been as characteristic of the the social,
>political and intellectual history of the 19th and 20th century as this
>one. After the "French" and "Industrial Revolution" as well as the
>"academic and scientific" revolutions and the artistic avantgardes from
>the end of the 19th century onwards, social conflicts have been deeply
>informed by the idea of revolution. On the one hand, "revolution" was
>regarded in terms of a radical break with the old order swept away in an
>explosive act of emancipatory practice. On the other hand, social
>revolution has often been rejected as a senseless dissolution of all
>order and as a symptom of social decline.
>
>According to neo-conservative and neo-liberal, and even some
>left-liberal circles, the era of political and social revolutions in
>world history has ended with the 1989 "revolutionary" collapse of
>state-socialist regimes in Central and Eastern Europe. Yet while these
>conservative critics claim that revolutionary action has more or less
>ceased to inform the political imaginary both in the "third world" and
>in the industrialized and democratic societies of the West, these same
>critics hold that the sphere of scientific and technological revolutions
>must be exempted from the diagnosis of the waning of revolutionary
>ideology, as these continue to transform our "natural" and social
>worlds. A "left" and probably less dominant variant of this discourse
>has deconstructed the classical idea of political and social revolution,
>and situates revolutionary action solely in the "realm of signs".
>
>Yet recently these diagnoses have been increasingly called into
>question, both in theory and in practice. "Revolution" has been set on
>the agenda again as a result of popular and revolutionary movements in
>Latin America, Asia and Africa, the critique of neoliberalim (Attac,
>World Social Forum, anti-Hartz movement in Germany etc.), the violent
>clashes of the young with the state in Western European metropolises,
>but also the new intellectual debates about strategies of the Left in a
>globalized capitalism.
>
>It is the goal of to engage in an academic and political debate about
>the contradictions, breaks and challenges of social, political and
>cultural revolutions in the 21st century. Among the questions to be
>discussed at this conference are:
>
>Conference contributions could focus on one of the following areas:
>
># How do revolutionary acts differ from other forms of practice?
># What can be the conditions, subjects, agents and (unintended) results of
>revolutionary practice or of the revolutionization of entire societies?
># What are the main possible sites of revolutionary action in the 21st
>century?
># In what discursive formations are revolutions embedded?
># How can their traditions, vocabularies, and lines of thought be
>accounted for?
>etc.
>
>We are looking forward to contributions that discuss theoretical,
>reflexive, political, practical, ideological and aesthetic aspects of
>revolutionary action in the 21st century. We welcome proposals dealing
>with approaches of (un-)intended social transformation (revolution,
>evolution, reform etc.) The conference will bring together manifold
>perspectives (e.g. poststructuralist, Marxist, feminist, postcolonial,
>constructivist, system-theoretical perspectives) from various
>disciplines (sociology, cultural studies, international ralations,
>history, philosophy, literature etc.).
>
>
>
>Transforma intends to facilitate the intraction and exchange among young
>academics.  Therefore, again, a special students' forum will be offered
>with the aim of giving students the opportunity to present their own
>work in a convivial setting. The students' forum will comprise students'
>papers only but will be open to all transforma participants. It will
>address the general conference topic but may have its own focal points.
>
>
>Conference languages: English and German. For your registration,
>the submission of proposals, and for general information, please visit
>http://www.transforma-online.de,
>contact: [log in to unmask] (Anke Bartels).
>
>Deadline for submission of proposals (250 words): as soon as possible,
>but no later than April 15th, 2006. Competitive, refereed selection.
>Accepted paper presenters are expected to provide a short version
>(3 - 5 pages) of their papers as a web contribution up to June 15th, 2006.
>We are planning to publish a selection of contributions in the conference
>proceedings.
>
>Please submit your registration and your paper proposal through our web
>form.
>
>Organizers: Johannes Angerm¸ller (Department of Sociology), Dietmar
>Fricke (Department of Political Science), Britta Krause (Department of
>Political Science), Michael Schultze (Department of Political
>Science), J–rg Meyer (Department of Political Science), Agata
>Stopinska (European Studies), Dirk Wiemann (Department of Foreign
>Languages), Raj Kollmorgen (Department of Sociology), Anke Bartels
>(Department of Foreign
>Languages)
>

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