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>
>Subject: CFP: 1968: Global Resistance and Local 
>Knowledge (grad) (4/15/06; 11/3/06-11/4/06)
>From: "Cheryl C. Oestreicher" <[log in to unmask]>
>
>
>1968: Global Resistance and Local Knowledge
>Graduate Student Conference
>
>Modern History and Literature Program, Casperson School of Graduate Studies
>Drew University, Madison New Jersey
>November 3-4, 2006
>Email: [log in to unmask]
>Website: http://groups.drew.edu/68hist
>
>Within the emergent field of 1960s studies, 
>there is a widespread consensus concerning the 
>global significance of 1968. Scholarly interest 
>in this year stems foremost from its many 
>revolutionary eruptions and repercussions, 
>including the radical urban uprisings of French 
>and German youth; the revolt-induced invasion of 
>Czechoslovakia by Soviet forces; the activist 
>phase of the Chinese Cultural Revolution; and 
>other uprisings in Mexico City and Tokyo. Other 
>events of historic magnitude include the Tet 
>offensive, violence at the Democratic National 
>Convention in Chicago, the student takeover of 
>Columbia University, and the assassinations of 
>Martin Luther King, Jr. and Robert Kennedy.
>
>Recent academic discussions of 1968 have focused 
>upon the question of its systemic significance. 
>Were the wide-ranging instances of social unrest 
>that erupted throughout this year the 
>manifestations of a global zeitgeist, 
>conditioned or at least influenced by 
>macro-economic and geopolitical forces? 
>Contrarily, were these phenomena the outgrowth 
>of primarily local and unrelated conditions? Or 
>does a satisfying conclusion require a partial 
>synthesis of both these possibilities?
>
>The Drew University Modern History and 
>Literature Program Graduate Student Conference 
>on 1968 will attempt to explore this question 
>from a number of different angles. Areas of 
>interest include:
>
>Ģ Geographies of Protest: rebel energies in 
>Western and Eastern Europe, North and Latin 
>America, China and Southeast Asia.
>Ģ Gender Trouble: radical transformations in 
>gender relations and sexual identity; the 
>women's movement; gay and lesbian rights 
>activism. 
>Ģ Protest and Print Culture: pamphlets, 
>manifestoes, plays, the underground press, 
>literature, posters, graphic novels, and 
>comix.
>Ģ Popular Culture and the Media Massage: 
>cross-referential/interdisciplinary 
>investigations into film, music, television, 
>advertising, fashion, and pop-art.
>Ģ Political Ideologies: Marxism, Maoism, 
>anarchism, the Frankfurt School, Situationism, 
>internationalism, anti-colonialism, liberalism, 
>the roots of contemporary conservatism.
>Ģ Theoretical Explorations: the rise and fall 
>of Marxism, the universal vs. the local 
>intellectual, post-structuralist stirrings, 
>anticipations of globalization.
>Ģ Counter-cultures: hippies, Yippies, Diggers, 
>Provos , communards, enrags, happenings, 
>undergrounds, scenes.
>Ģ Technology: Future Shock; cybernetics and 
>informatics; from Haight-Ashbury to Silicon 
>Valley; the birth of the digital revolution.
>Ģ Religion: liberation theology; priests, 
>pastors, and protest; journeys East and West; 
>origins of New Age religion; the roots of 
>contemporary fundamentalisms.
>
>The papers need not be limited to the areas and 
>topics listed above, nor the year 1968 as such. 
>Rather, we encourage the creative combination of 
>two or more areas of interest, as well as 
>attempts to theorize the connection between 
>various events, logics, and genres.
>
>Those submitting paper proposals should be 
>graduate students, post-docs, or very recent 
>Ph.D.'s. Please submit a one-page abstract of 
>your paper with your affiliation and contact 
>information by snail mail or email to:
>
>Cheryl Oestreicher, Conference Chair
>Drew-CM 1124
>36 Madison Avenue
>Madison , NJ 07940
>[log in to unmask]
>
>Keynote Speaker: Jeremy Suri, Professor of 
>History, University of Wisconsin  Madison. 
>Author of Power and Protest: Global Revolution 
>and the Rise of Dtente (Harvard) and The 
>Global Revolutions of 1968 (Norton, forthcoming).
>
>Special Presenter: Mark Rudd, leader of the 1968 
>Columbia University strike and occupation; 
>National Secretary of Students for a Democratic 
>Society; co-founder of the Weather Underground.
>
>Faculty Sponsor: Jeremy Varon, Professor of 
>History, Drew University. Author of Bringing the 
>War Home: The Weather Underground, the Red Army 
>Faction, and Revolutionary Violence in the 
>Sixties and Seventies (California ).
>
>Drew University is located in Madison New 
>Jersey, thirty miles from New York City . A 
>commuter train runs from Madison to Penn Station 
>in less than an hour.
>

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