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>
>From: "Rynott, Carolyn Jo" <[log in to unmask]>
>
>Please post:
>
>
>Call for Papers
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>
>The graduate students of the Department of 
>Germanic Languages and Literatures at the 
>University of Kansas (Graduate Association of 
>German Students - GAGS) are announcing a call 
>for papers for their 10th annual 
>interdisciplinary conference to be held on
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>
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>February 24th-25th, 2006 in Lawrence, Kansas.
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>Abstracts from graduate students and scholars 
>from the humanities and social sciences are 
>welcome.  This year the focus of our conference 
>is
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>"Denk ich an Deutschland..."
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>-
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>Deutsche Identitšt in Selbstwahrnehmung und Fremddarstellung
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>What defines German identity?
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>In what ways do culture, history and politics 
>contribute to a society's identity?
>
>How does the world's view affect the German identity?
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>Possible topics may include but are not limited to:
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>
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>Literature/Cultural Studies:
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>-         How is German identity defined in 
>German literature? How has it been defined in 
>non-German literature? 
>
>-         How do different authors define it and 
>how are these definitions similar/different?  Do 
>characters in specific literary works construct 
>their own identity or is constructed by others? 
>Is there an area of conflict where these two 
>differently constructed and therefore perhaps 
>differing German identities collide?  If so, how 
>is the conflict resolved - if at all?
>
>-         Has the way German identity has been 
>defined by various authors, German or otherwise, 
>over the centuries changed?  What factors have 
>influenced such a change? 
>
>-         Has the way a specific author has 
>defined German identity changed over the course 
>of his/her writing?  If so, what factors have 
>influenced it? 
>
>-         How have specific cultural/historical 
>events influenced/changed the way German authors 
>construct German identity and how have they 
>influenced the way non-German authors construct 
>it? 
>
>-         How have various authors 
>answered/addressed the question of whether there 
>is a national German identity?  How do they 
>define it?  Does the answer differ depending on 
>the nationality of the writer?
>
>-         How does German identity influence the 
>view other nations take of Germans/Germany and 
>how do other nations' views in turn 
>affect/influence German identity?
>
>-         How many "German" identities are there? 
>
>Linguistics/Applied Linguistics:
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>-         How is German identity expressed in 
>language?  Is it newly constructed by speakers 
>every time they speak of is it a constant 
>underlying every utterance?  How is it 
>constructed and how is it expressed? 
>
>-         Do speakers construct their own 
>identity or is it (also) constructed by other 
>conversation participants?  How?  In case of an 
>area of conflict between the two, how can it be 
>defined and how, if at all, is it resolved? 
>
>-         How do language learners or bilinguals 
>define their "German" identity when speaking 
>German?  How does it differ from or in turn 
>influence the identity they construct in their 
>native social and linguistic background? 
>
>-         In multilingual conversations, how do 
>the variously constructed identities work 
>together? 
>
>-         How does the addressee influence the identity constructed?
>
>-         How do migrating German speakers 
>see/construct their identity?  How does it 
>change by their migrating lifestyle and how is 
>that reflected in their language? 
>
>-         How is identity reflected in speakers 
>of a German dialect?  Do speakers have more than 
>one identity depending on the language 
>variety/register they use?  How is that 
>expressed?  What outside factors influence the 
>use of the register/identity chosen?
>
>
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>The purpose of this conference is to examine the 
>German identity through history to the present 
>and in the future, how that identity is 
>represented in literature and expressed in the 
>German language, and how the German identity has 
>been received in the world.
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>
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>Abstracts of 500 words must be received by 
>January 16th.  We will be conducting a blind 
>review so a separate cover sheet with name, 
>contact information and title of abstract is 
>recommended. 
>
>   
>
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>Your GAGS committee,
>
>
>
>http://www.ku.edu/~germanic/
>
>

*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
Editor: Stefani Engelstein
Assistant Editor:  Megan McKinstry
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
Info available at: http://www.missouri.edu/~graswww/resources/gerlistserv.html