Print

Print


>
>From: "Lindsay Holmgren" <[log in to unmask]>
>
>Subject: CFP: Selfhood in a Posthuman Context (grad) (1/10/06; 
>McGill, 3/11/06-3/12/06)
>
>12th Annual Graduate Conference on Language and Literature: McGill
>University, Montreal
>
>Theme: Permeability and Selfhood
>
>March 11-12, 2006
>
>
>
>This call for papers is for a panel to be held at Permeability and Selfhood,
>the McGill Graduate Conference on Language and Literature, which will take
>place March 11-12 at McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.  
>
>
>
>Selfhood in a Posthuman Context
>
>
>
>     This panel will address fictional representations of the "posthuman" in
>twentieth-century narrative prose and/or film. Concepts of the posthuman
>attempt to theorize the human being as a multiplicity of selves: from a
>plethora of cyberselves coded in ones and zeros (in email, text messages,
>weblogs, etc.), to a combination of DNA molecules, to a biological, embodied
>individual, to a consciousness with an independent will. The posthuman
>understands humanity as being involved in a process of combination or
>replacement by such entities as cybernetic mechanisms, computer simulations,
>nanotechnologies and robots.
>
>     A number of theorists work to reclaim the human body for the posthuman
>being; however, many narratives nostalgically construct the posthuman
>subject as essentially a cluster of significations (transferable or even
>downloadable consciousness, DNA codes, etc.) and therefore as not embodied.
>This panel is interested in how such narratives hark back to late-nineteenth
>and early-twentieth-century ideas about human beings as essentially
>consciousnesses, which do not depend upon a body for survival. For example,
>papers might address characters' resistance to the many biological,
>technological and economic networks that progressively diminish their
>agency. Turning on fiction of the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth
>centuries, theories of the posthuman sensitize us to the following kinds of
>questions: How does the human in twentieth-century fiction attempt to assert
>or, at the very least, understand itself in a context resistant to
>individual selfhood? In what ways does the writing subject, as well as the
>resulting narrative in which the human being is represented, support an
>understanding of the human being as signified and signifiable information
>and thereby undermine the embodiment of the posthuman subject?
>
>
>
>Some paper topics might include:
>
>
>
>Posthuman agency
>
>
>
>
>The ethics of the posthuman subject
>
>
>
>Consciousness as selfhood / consciousness as fiction
>
>
>
>Science fiction and the posthuman gothic
>
>
>
>Writing as humanist act
>
>
>
>The figure of the monster in narrative fiction
>
>__________________________________
>
>
>
>The deadline for paper proposals is January 10, 2006. Please send abstracts
>of approximately 300 words to  <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>[log in to unmask]  The keynote speaker for the conference will be
>Terry Castle, Walter A. Haas Professor in the Humanities at Stanford
>University.  More information about the conference is available at
><http://www.arts.mcgill.ca/programs/english/grad/gradsymp/>
>http://www.arts.mcgill.ca/programs/english/grad/gradsymp/.

*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
Editor: Stefani Engelstein
Assistant Editor:  Megan McKinstry
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
Info available at: http://www.missouri.edu/~graswww/resources/gerlistserv.html