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>
>From: Patrick Gallagher <[log in to unmask]>
>
>Subject: CFP: Civil Order and Its Breakdowns (grad) (2/1/06; 4/1/06)
>
>To whom it may concern:
>   Paper proposals are being accepted for the upcoming Graduate Student
>Conference "Alles in Ordnung?", to be held April 1st, 2006, at Columbia
>University's Germanic Languages Department. The organizers would be most
>appreciative if you would post the following on your graduate student
>list-serve. The deadline for abstract submissions is February 1st, 2006.
>  For further information, please contact Patrick Gallagher at
>[log in to unmask]
>  ___________________________
>
>*Grad Student Conference*
>
>*Columbia University, April 1st, 2006*
>
>*"Alles in Ordnung?" : Civil Order and Its Breakdowns*
>
>  History bears witness, again and again, to the collapse of the public
>sphere and the outbreak of civil disorder on a mass scale. In recent times,
>a grotesque mix of natural disaster, official incompetence, socioeconomic
>inequality, and racism has made the fragility of civil order, even in the
>most superficially developed-looking of countries, painfully evident.
>
>  We plan to hold a conference on the collapse of civil order, with an
>emphasis on the ways in which such events have been represented in
>literature, the arts, philosophy, and theory. We are also interested in
>papers examining instances in which cultural texts have themselves fomented
>the political action of the crowds, as well as in papers exploring ways in
>which cultural texts have informed social-scientific and official
>discourses. Our goal is to explore the reciprocal relationships between
>state, society, and culture and how they constitute and/or undermine civil
>order.
>
>  We are looking forward to reading submissions about both the reality and
>the fantasy of civil disorder, for which reason we encourage abstracts whic=
>h
>combine research in multiple disciplines.
>
>  *****As long as there has been civil order, there has been civil disorder.=
>  How
>could civil disorders in variegated national and historical contexts, such
>as the disturbances following the end of World War I in Germany, widespread
>urban rioting in the United States in the 1960's, the May 1968 uprising in
>France, the popular uprisings that contributed to the movements of national
>liberation among European colonies culminating around 1960, or any number o=
>f
>incidents from earlier centuries be related to one another?
>
>  *****How has civil disorder figured in literature? What are potential
>relationships between texts that depict particular historical occurrences o=
>f
>civil disorder and those that attempt to stage it in fictional scenarios? W=
>hat
>is the relationship between civil disorder in literature and the genres of
>utopian and dystopian literature?
>
>  *****Is civil disorder "Romantic"?
>
>  *****To what extent can the breaking down of state legitimacy and civil
>order be said to contain a structural analogy with the breaking down of
>traditional literary and artistic forms with the emergence of
>modernism/postmodernism?
>
>  *****Civil disorder has also played a curious role in the history of
>philosophy, at once central and marginal. "Disorder," "mob rule," and the
>"pressure of the street" represent serious problems in the work of Kant and
>Habermas, while, in the work of Hegel and Marx, the competitive structure o=
>f
>"b=FCrgerliche Gesellschaft" makes its collapse all but inevitable. What is
>the role of disorder in defining concepts of order?
>
>  *****How has the figuration of the collapse of civil order in propaganda
>either influenced or been influenced by culture and the arts?
>
>  *****How has the figuration of civil disorder in literature and culture
>influenced public policy? To what extent do massive urban planning projects=
>,
>such as Hausmann's allegedly barricade-proof boulevards in Paris, take thei=
>r
>inspiration from cultural phantasm, empirical/scientific observation, or
>both?
>
>  *****How does the collapse of civil order figure in the medium of film? Re=
>cent
>examples have included Roland Emmerich's Independence Day and The Day After
>Tomorrow, as well as the Mad Max and Terminator series. Outside of science
>fiction, Haskell Wexler's Medium Cool and Gillo Pontecorvo's The Battle of
>Algiers also figure prominently.
>
>  _________________________________
>
>  Please submit abstracts of no more than 500 words by February 1st, 2006 to
>[log in to unmask] Paper drafts will be due by March 6, 2006.

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