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I just happened to be sitting on my deck (although I live in town, my backyard is completely wooded) about 5:30PM when two barred owls flew into one of my walnut trees.  One owl struck the other, then assumed a dominant position in the tree fork above its adversary. The disadvantaged owl ( for lack of a better term) was obviously looking for a way to escape.  Finally, it broke for the open air . . . with the other one on its tail.  I got on-line and looked up barred owls.  It said that they become territorial during the spring and fall and contest territory.  It also said that physical contact to drive off a competitor was rare.  Guess I got to see a rarity.  
 
Steve Reese
 
Lee's Summit, Mo.


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