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Eliot has had a strong influence on how people perceive the world.
If perception is important as a subject then Eliot's work is important.
Eliot generated the effects of what he perceived. If his effect on
you is to generate repulsion, it is because what he perceived was repulsive,
and still is repulsive. In fact that was an aspect of the world he 
delberately
set out to explore, using Baudelaire and the symbolists as his guide:
===========================================================
      I think that from Baudelaire I learned first a precedent for the
      poetical  possibilities, never developed by any post writing in my
      own language, of the more sordid aspects of the modern metropolis,
      of the possibility of fusion between the sordidly realistic and the
      phangtasmagoric, the possibility of the juxtaposition of the matter
      of fact and the fantastic. From him, as from Laforgue, I learned
      that the sort of  material that I had, the sort of experience that
      an adolescent had had, in an industrial city in America, could be
      the material for poetry; and that the source of new poetry might be
      found in what had been regarded hitherto as the impossible, the
      sterile, the intractably unpoetic. That, in fact, the business of
      the poet was to make poetry out of the unexplored resources of the
      unpoetical; that the poet, in fact, was committed by his profession
      to turn the unpoetical into poetry. A great poet can give a younger
      poet everything that he has to give him, in a very few lines. It may
      be that I am indebted to Baudelaire chiefly for half a dozen lines
      out of the whole of Fleurs du Mal; and that his significance for me
      is summed up in the lines:
           Fourmillante Cite, cite pleine dereves,
           Ou le spectre en plein jour raccroche le passant...
      I knew what that meant, because I had lived it before I knew that I
      wanted to turn it into verse on my own account.
      ------------------------------------------------------------
      Eliot, T.S. "What Dante Means to Me." TO CRITICIZE THE CRITIC.
         London: Faber, 1965.


Morris, Craig wrote:

> 
>Eliot's poetry on the whole strikes me as repulsive and yet there are
>images and verses that are more compelling than any other words I have
>read. If anyone can articulate why Eliot is worth studying (with a 16/17
>year old audience in mind) I would be grateful for your thoughts. 
>
>Kind regards,
>
>Craig
>
>
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