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>Date: Mon, 29 Aug 2005 09:37:50 -0700 (PDT)
>From: Leslie Fife <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: CFP: Adaptation (11/1/05; PCA/ACA, 4/12/06-4/15/06)
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>
>Adaptation: The State of the Field, Call for Papers
>
>
>
>For the 2006 Popular Culture Association 
>(PCA)/American Culture Association (ACA) 
>conference in Atlanta, Georgia, at the Atlanta 
>Marriott Marquis,  from April 12th to April 15th.
>
>
>
>Adaptation: The State of the Field
>
>
>
>Itís likely that both literature and film owe a 
>great deal more to the notion of adaptation than 
>practitioners of either discipline are likely to 
>admit.  Bakhtin suggested that ìEuropean novel 
>prose is born and shaped in the process of a 
>free (that is reformulating) translation of 
>othersí works.î  Literary prose, and perhaps the 
>very idea of literature, he suggests, was 
>developed in an act of adaptation.
>
>
>
>Nevertheless, adaptation studies has long been 
>the step-child to both literary studies and film 
>studies.  Caught as it is between disciplines it 
>has struggled for years to find legitimacy. 
>Since at least the time of George Bluestone, 
>however, a handful of scholars has worked to 
>understand film adaptation not simply as a way 
>of thinking about literary works that have been 
>adapted to the screen, but in a larger context 
>of mimesis, influence, and intertextuality that 
>dates back to the time of Plato.  Recent works 
>by Stam, Naremore, McFarlane and others suggest 
>that Adaptation studies have reached a new level 
>of maturity and demand even more serious 
>scholarly attention.  This section of the 
>American Culture Association is looking for 
>papers on any aspect of adaptation.  This 
>includes papers treating the adaptation of 
>literature to film and other new media, film and 
>other new media to literature, literature to 
>literature, etc.  ìLiteratureî is defined 
>broadly here to include eve!
>  rything
>  from novels and biographies to childrenís books and comics.
>
>
>
>We are particularly interested in papers that 
>address the state of the field in adaptation as 
>theory, practice, and pedagogy.  We hope to 
>bring together adaptation scholars in an effort 
>to begin a more in depth discussion about 
>adaptation, both as it pertains to the limited 
>field of adaptation studies and how it might 
>affect other theoretical approaches.
>
>
>
>--How should ìadaptationî be defined?
>
>
>
>--What makes a ìgoodî adaptation?
>
>
>
>--How should adapted works be studied?
>
>
>
>--How should adaptation theory be more generally 
>applied to film, literature, and the arts?
>
>
>
>--What is the best way to approach adaptations 
>in the high school or college classroom?
>
>
>
>Please send 150-250 word abstracts via email to 
>Dr. Dennis Cutchins [log in to unmask]
>
>
>
>Or by regular mail to
>
>Dr. Dennis Cutchins
>
>English Department
>
>Brigham Young University
>
>Provo, UT 84602
>
>
>
>Deadline for Abstracts: November 1, 2005

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