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>
>From: "Amanda E Irwin Wilkins ([log in to unmask])"@lists.sas.upenn.edu
>
>Subject: CFP: The Human and Its Others (10/1/05; ACLA, 3/23/06-3/26/06)
>
>CALL FOR PAPERS
>ACLA '06:  THE HUMAN AND ITS OTHERS
>American Comparative Literature Association Annual Conference
>Princeton University, March 23-26, 2006
>
>ACLA 2006 will take place at Princeton University on March 23-26, 
>2006 (Thursday evening through Sunday noon).  Hosted by the 
>Department of Comparative Literature, along with other Departments 
>and Programs in the humanities and the creative arts, the conference 
>will focus on a central theme, The Human and Its Others.
>
>What does it mean to be -- or not be -- "human?" In the long history 
>of attempts to draw boundaries around the human, in efforts to 
>define its mental, spiritual, physical, and linguistic 
>particularities, as well as its ideals, its failures, and, in the 
>view of some, its extinction in a 'posthuman' era, literature has 
>encountered almost every other discipline and domain of experience. 
>It has also participated in the creation of a series of "others" 
>against which -- and whom -- the human has defined and measured 
>itself. Looking to literary examples and theoretical distinctions, 
>to changes through time and through cultures, to explanations 
>arising from modern technologies as well as from ancient myths, we 
>will highlight a range of questions: How does literature, along with 
>the other creative arts, help define the human? How do definitions 
>differ according to time and place?  How elastic is the idea of the 
>human? How has it been shaped by religion, politics, philosophy, 
>science,
>  economics, medicine, and technology? Against what images, ideas, 
>dreams, and nightmares has it been defined and refined? And why does 
>it seem to be a particularly pertinent, if not pressing, concern for 
>us today? The conference invites discussion of these various issues 
>as they have helped create our sense of literature, the 
>"humanities," and, of course, the study of Comparative Literature.
>
>The Conference Program Committee invites proposals for seminars on 
>any topic falling under the conference title's ample possibilities. 
>The categories below provide some examples:
>
>Language and the Human
>Keeping Time
>Literature, the Arts, the Human
>Embodiment/Disembodiment
>The Renaissance Individual
>Literature and Human Rights
>The Posthuman
>Religion and the Human
>Space and Movement
>The Language of Animals
>Translation and Metamorphosis
>Media and the Human
>Gendering the Human
>The Invention of the Human                          
>Cyborgs and Automata
>Magic, Spirituality and the Human
>The Human and the Natural World.
>Endgames   
>Philosophy, Literature and the Human
>Relativity and the Human
>The Humanistic Tradition
>Monsters and Angels
>Representing the 'subject'
>
>The ACLA's annual conferences have a distinctive structure in which 
>most papers are grouped into twelve-person seminars that meet two 
>hours per day for the three days of the conference to foster 
>extended discussion. Some eight-person (or smaller) seminars meet 
>just the first two days of the conference. This structure allows 
>each participant to be a full member of one seminar, and to sample 
>other seminars during the remaining time blocks. Previous conference 
>programs that show this pattern are available online at 
>www.acla.org. The conference also includes plenary sessions, a 
>business meeting, a banquet, and other events.
>
>Proposals should be submitted to our website: 
>www.princeton.edu/~acla06. The deadline for seminar proposals is 
>October 1, 2005. Seminars will be posted as they are accepted in 
>October, 2005. The deadline for individual paper proposals for these 
>seminars is November 30, 2005.

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