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>
>From: frederic pottier <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: CFP: Nineteenth Century Literature and 
>the Cultural Moment (grad) (11/15/05; 
>3/31/06-4/1/06)
>
>Nineteenth Century Literature and the Cultural Moment
>
>
>Graduate Student Literature Conference
>
>at the University of South Carolina, Columbia
>
>
>March 31-April 1, 2006
>
>
>
>
>Whether discussing the Industrial Revolution, 
>the Woman Question, or other forms of political 
>turmoil, many nineteenth-century writers 
>condensed larger issues of the day into specific 
>literary events -- or moments -- that both 
>reflected and defined the historical and 
>cultural climate of the time.   
>
>
>
>Our fourth annual graduate conference hopes to 
>examine key cultural moments of the nineteenth 
>century and their relationship to both 
>contemporary and modern literary creation, 
>criticism, and reception.  How was the 
>significance of a given moment either 
>crystallized or created by a literary work?  How 
>did specific historical events or movements 
>shape nineteenth-century literature?  How were 
>scientific innovations used by authors in their 
>works to reflect social or political 
>revolutions?  How did writers on opposite sides 
>of the Atlantic or on opposite sides of the 
>world respond to the same cultural moments? 
>How do modern cultural moments reflect or shape 
>our perception of nineteenth-century texts?
>
>
>
>Possible topics could include but are not limited to:
>
>    Historical and revolutionary moments 
>(responses to the American and French 
>Revolutions, the Act of Union, the Napoleonic 
>Wars, the War of 1812, the Corn Laws, the 
>Peterloo Massacre, the First Reform Bill, the 
>Mexican-American War, the Italian Revolution, 
>the Crimean War, the Civil War, the 
>assassination of Lincoln, Reconstruction)
>    Colonial moments (The Louisiana Purchase, the 
>Slavery Abolition Act, the Opium Wars, the Sepoy 
>Rebellion, the dissolution of the British East 
>India Company, the Boer Wars, Jim Crow)
>    Gender-specific and sexual moments (the 
>Custody of Infants Act, the Seneca Falls 
>Convention, bigamy trials, the Married Womanís 
>Property and Divorce Act, the Criminal Law 
>Amendment Act, the formation of the National 
>American Woman Suffrage Association, Oscar 
>Wildeís trial)
>    Scientific moments (the opening of Jessopís 
>Surrey Iron Railway, the Apothecaries Act, the 
>Anatomy Act, publication of The Origin of 
>Species, the vivisection debate)
>    Ideological moments (the Second Great 
>Awakening, the publication of the Communist 
>Manifesto)
>    Artistic and literary moments (the 
>publication of Lyrical Ballads, the invention of 
>steel plate engraving, the Copyright Act of 
>1842, the birth of the Pre-Raphaelites, the 
>Wagner/Brahms debate)
>    Celebratory moments (emancipations, jubilees, 
>turn-of-the-century celebrations, the end of the 
>Spanish Inquisition, The Great Exhibition)
>
>  Abstracts of 250 words or less are due by 
>November 15, 2005.  Please include your name, 
>the name of your institution and program, and 
>any A/V needs that you may have.  Submit 
>abstracts electronically via email to respective 
>representatives:
>
>
>
>Jessie Bray (American Literature) 
>Celeste Pottier (British Literature)
>
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>
>
>
>
>
>Shelley Johnson (Comparative Literature or non-English literature)
>
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