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I did not receive the original on which this is based.
Any fix possible?
P.

Rickard A. Parker wrote:

>Nancy Gish wrote:
>  
>
>>I did explain.  See the poems I noted.  I will be glad to quote them
>>and add a definition of "perverse" if you wish.  By any standard, a
>>poem about strangling a woman and sleeping with her is "perverse." So
>>is a poem about Sweeney after sex, with an epileptic straining on the
>>bed while he ignores her.  So is a poem about imagining oneself a
>>young girl raped by an old man in a forest and also imagining oneself
>>as the old man.  I can give a long list if you like.
>>    
>>
>
>
>Nocturne
>
>Romeo, grand sérieux, to importune
>Guitar and hat in hand, beside the gate
>With Juliet, in the usual debate
>Of love, beneath a bored but courteous moon;
>The conversation failing, strikes some tune
>Banal, and out of pity for their fate
>Behind the wall I have some servant wait,
>Stab, and the lady sinks into a swoon.
>
>Blood looks effective on the moonlit ground--
>The hero smiles; in my best mode oblique
>Rolls toward the moon a frenzied eye profound,
>(No need of "Love forever?"--"Love next week?")
>While female readers all in tears are drowned:--
>"The perfect climax all true lovers seek!"
>
>
>http://world.std.com/~raparker/exploring/tseliot/works/poems/eliot-harvard-poems.html
>
>
>  
>


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