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Well, Peter mentioned Crippen, we've had Sweeney and a gallon of lysol in
a bath and now to add to the mixture--Marie Lloyd, written about by TSE.

You can chalk this one up as another of my weird posts but just this
evening I serendipitously found a Crippen/Lloyd connection.  At Wikipedia:

    Although popular enough to command her own fees, Lloyd backed and
    supported the 1906 strike for better terms by music hall
    performers. She was picketing one theatre when she recognised someone
    trying to enter. Lloyd shouted, "Let her through girls, she'll close
    the music hall faster than we can." The singer was Belle Elmore, later
    murdered by her husband, Dr Crippen.
    
And for a Sweeney/Crippen comparison:

  SWEENEY:
    I knew a man once did a girl in
    Any man might do a girl in
    Any man has to, needs to, wants to
    Once in a lifetime, do a girl in.
    Well he kept her there in a bath
    With a gallon of lysol in a bath

  WIKIPEDIA:
    Crippen's trial revealed the startlingly meticulous manner in which he
    had disposed of his wife. After killing her, he professionally removed
    her bones and limbs, which he then burned in the kitchen stove. Her
    organs were dissolved in acid in the bathtub, and her head was placed
    in a handbag and thrown overboard during a day trip to Dieppe.

Oh, about my subject line (we were talking of perversity, weren't we?):

  CRIPPEN MURDER IS A LENS INTO EDWARDIAN ENGLAND
    Curiously, as reporting on the case evolved, Crippen was transformed
    from a vicious killer to a "mild-mannered little man" whose execution
    was met with some regret. T.S. Eliot appeared at a costume party
    dressed as Crippen, and the American author Raymond Chandler later
    sighed, "You just can't help liking this guy somehow."


Eliot on Marie Lloyd:
    http://world.std.com/~raparker/exploring/books/london_letter_1922_12.html
Marie Lloyd:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Lloyd
Dr. Crippen:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dr_Crippen
Crippen murder is a lens into Edwardian England:
    http://www.uah.edu/News/2000rr/england.html


Regards,
    Rick Parker