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>
>From: "Anna Jones" <[log in to unmask]>
>
>Subject: CFP: Introducing...Theory: Teaching Literary Theory to 
>Undergraduates (5/10/05; SAMLA, 11/4/05-11/6/05)
>
>CALL FOR PAPERS
>
>Special Session: "Introducing...Theory: Teaching Literary Theory to
>Undergraduates"
>SAMLA 2005 Convention, November 4-6, Atlanta Geogia
>Proposals due May 10, 2005
>
>If, as Terry Eagleton claims in his retrospective critique After Theory
>(2004), ěthe golden age of cultural theory is long past,î and it is ětime to
>take stock of where we areî (1-2), then part of that analysis must be aimed
>at the institutionalization of theory in the undergraduate English
>curriculum. Literary theory has become a staple of many undergraduate
>English programs, but for students who encounter it packaged in introductory
>survey courses, theory may seem divorced from the practice of literary
>scholarship in general. Moreover, theoryís tumultuous history in the academy
>may be erased, turned into a medley of ěgreatest hits.î Yet, in some ways
>undergraduate studentsí first experiences with literary theory restage the
>epiphanies (and resistances) that occurred in the discipline in the latter
>decades of the 20th century--that is, their grappling with deconstruction or
>discovering feminism reenacts some of the institutional struggles and
>discoveries that are ělong pastî for us. Thus, in this discussion session,
>we seek to explore the possibilities and challenges of introducing theory to
>a new generation of literary scholars.
>We invite papers that address any aspect of literary theory in the
>undergraduate curriculum. Possible topics might include:
>	*	teaching theory ěafter theoryî
>	*	specific approaches to teaching theory (in general or 
>a particular
>theory)
>	*	theory as pedagogical praxis
>	*	ethical/political aspects of literary theory in the classroom
>	*	addressing resistance to theory (a.k.a. ěWhy canít we just read
>literature?î)
>	*	teaching theory as the history of literary studies
>Because this is a discussion session, presentations should be limited to
>10-15 minutes and should be geared toward fostering dialogue, posing
>questions, inviting debate.
>
>Please send 250-300 word proposals via email to Anna Maria Jones at
><[log in to unmask]> or Patricia Angley at <[log in to unmask]>, or
>via mail: Department of English, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL
>32816-1346. Electronic submissions preferred.

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