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>
>From: Colin Irvine <[log in to unmask]>
>
>Subject: CFP: Teaching the Novel (5/15/05; MMLA, 11/10/05-11/13/05)
>
>*For the 47th Annual Convention of the Midwest Modern Language Association*
>**
>*November 10-13, 2005 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin *
>
>
>*"Teaching the Novel as Genre: Best Practices for Cultivating Critical
>Thinking and Careful Analysis." *Professors in many English departments
>and across disciplines are increasingly weaving the genre of the novel
>into their courses; and, consequently, we're seeing novels appear in
>everything from criticism classes to courses in sports and literature
>and literature and the landscape. This temptation and corresponding
>tendency to assign what often proves to be an unwieldy, but rewarding
>type of text to teach leads to a number of questions: Why do we teach
>novels? How do we teach them? What do we have our students doing with
>them? Which novels cultivate the kinds of critical thinking germane to
>specific issues, topics, or themes? How does teaching novels help
>instructors achieve objectives and goals? How, in short, do we make
>reading these works a truly novel, meaningful experience? Colin Irvine,
>Augsburg College, [log in to unmask] <mailto:[log in to unmask]>
>
>

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