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>From: Benjamin Schreier <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: CFP: Essays in Culture and Irreversibility (5/30/05; collection)
>
>Call for Papers: Essays in Culture and Irreversibility (Collection).
>Proposals due 30 May 2005; completed essays likely due September 2005.
>
>Submissions are sought for a collection of papers that has attracted
>strong interest from a press. Essays should address cultural
>representations of experience that are not amenable to metaphors of
>return, advent, or re-collection. Numerous attempts have been made to
>characterize the modes of intelligent experience. These have included
>efforts to locate conceptual apparatus that underlie apperception,
>metaphors that lend narrative meaning to experience, or socio-cultural
>structures that enable the detection of historical significance, to
>name a few. But such conceptualizations often end up revealing a
>messianism or other teleology subtending the human experience of
>history. Work remains to be pursued on the sense, knowledge, or
>experience of irreversibility. Importantly, this experience is
>different from nostalgia, which derives its charge from (and is
>underwritten by) a fantasy of return. And it is incompatible with
>existential concern with memory centered on the subject as a kind of
>collector, anchor, or focus of historical significance. If messianic
>structures posit a future to justify the present (if by way of the
>past), this collection is devoted to examining experience from the
>perspective of its rearview mirror.
>
>Papers should contribute to an analysis of the experience of
>irretrievability, inaccessibility, irreparability, irremediability,
>irrevocability, or any other form of irreversibility. The purview of
>this collection spans the concerns of several disciplines, including
>philosophy, ethics, literature, history, art history, linguistics,
>religion, physics, politics, and sociology, to name a few.
>
>Questions, problems, or perspectives that might be considered include,
>but are by no means limited to, the following:
>1. What are the outlines or history of a theory of irreversibility?
>2. How is irreversibility represented?
>3. How does the experience of irretrievability take shape as a cultural
>form?
>4. How does recognition of irrevocability force a reconceptualization
>of the experiences of "looking backward" or "looking forward" away from
>their respective meanings within a progressive understanding of
>history?
>5. What sort of challenge (if any) does irreversibility pose to
>teleology?
>6. What kinds of politics are compatible with a theory of history as
>irremediability? Is such a theory of history radical or conservative?
>7. Which authors would be included in a literary history of
>irreversibility?
>8. What does a morality or ethics grounded in the recognition of
>historical irreversibility-i.e., of choices or decisions-look like?
>9. Is the worldview that attends a conviction of irreversibility
>inherently pessimistic, or can it be optimistic?
>10. What role does a phenomenology of irreversibility play in
>contemporary culture?
>11. How does irreversibility affect the current socio-political
>dominance of identity-based thinking?
>
>Abstracts of about 500 words or so should be sent by 30 May 2005 to Ben
>Schreier at [log in to unmask] (MSWord attachments preferred) or,
>if necessary, Department of English (MC 162), University of Illinois at
>Chicago, 601 S. Morgan St., Chicago, IL 60607. Complete papers will
>probably be due in September.
>
>

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