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>From: [log in to unmask]
>
>Subject: CFP: Modernism and Ethics (5/3/05; MSA, 11/3/05-11/6/05)
>
>Modernist Studies Association 7th Annual Conference
>Nov. 3-6, 2005
>Chicago, Illinois
>
>The Ethics of Inner and Outer
>
>The early decades of the twentieth century were marked by a number of theories
>that highlighted the place of "consciousness" and "subjectivity" in the
>perception of reality (e.g., "stream of consciousness," Husserlian
>introspection). Yet at the same time, this period saw the rise of movements
>which questioned the relevance and existence of "inner worlds": e.g.,
>behaviorism, modern logic, Wittgenstein. As different as these 
>positions appear,
>however, both radical subjectivism and radical anti-subjectivism seem to allow
>little place for a meaningful ethical life. The subjectivist drowns in his own
>solipsism while the anti-subjectivist can only dismiss ethics as 
>mere "emotion"
>or a matter of "taste."
>
>How did Modernist writers respond to this divide? As commentators 
>have sometimes
>noted, some Modernist texts mark an "inward turn," while other texts embody a
>drive towards a more "objectivist" or "depersonalized" ideal. Does this mean,
>then, that Modernist literature, like much early twentieth-century 
>thought, also
>relegated ethics to a secondary place? How do Modernist writers picture our
>capacity to understand another person?  Does something like "sympathy" or
>"empathy" take up the slack, and how are these "feelings" or "intuitions"
>related to the style and form of the texts? If you want to reject 
>both the hope
>of getting "inside" another person and the despair of solipsism, how ought you
>to write about yourself or other people, or about anything?  What happens to
>language and to voices if we can no longer conceive of them as expressing
>something "inner," and how did the Modernists frame and respond to this
>challenge in the form as well as the content of what they wrote? 
>
>Topics might include:
>
>-Modernism and the social sciences
>
>-Psychologism and anti-psychologism
>
>-Emotion, empathy, ethics, and literature
>
>-Language and "stream of consciousness"
>
>-Wittgenstein and poetry
>
>-Pragmatism and Modernism
>
>-Positivism, Emotivism, science
>
>Consideration of particular authors and genres as well as primarily
>philosophical approaches to the topic are both welcome.
>
>Please send a 400 word abstract and a brief CV (either in MS Word, or pasted
>into the email) to [log in to unmask] by May 3.

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