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>From: Tom Jones <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: CFP: Conjectural Histories from the Renaissance to 
>Romanticism (3/15/06; journal issue)
>
>Forum for Modern Language Studies
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>Conjectural Histories from the Renaissance to Romanticism
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>A Special Issue for October 2006
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>Early modern writers frequently work conjectural histories into factual
>history and philosophical or political discourse. Speculating on the
>origins and nature of certain pre-historic social institutions such as
>language and law gives a writer the opportunity to vindicate or condemn the
>later development and current state of those institutions. Appeal to such
>theoretical, conjectural or rational history is part of the rhetoric of
>early modern writing, found as often in verse treatises as in histories,
>philosophical discourses, and legal tracts. Particularly since Derrida's
>attack on the assumption of such pre-historic priorities as that of speech
>over writing, conjectural history has become an object of sceptical
>inquiry. It is the aim of this Special Issue to investigate the breadth and
>variety of the practice of conjectural history in the early modern world
>(beyond as well as within Europe), and the role of conjectural historical
>thought in contemporary academic discourse.
>
>In addition to studies of the high period of conjectural history, the later
>eighteenth century, and its principle authors, such as David Hume,
>Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Johann Gottfreid Herder, it is hoped that the
>Special Issue will contain articles on both the progenitors and immediate
>inheritors of this mode of thought, including work on imaginative
>literature, political and economic writing, and philosophy. Papers tracing
>connections between more than one writer and/or language would be
>particularly welcome, as would papers that draw parallels between the
>analytical processes of the early modern period and those of the
>contemporary intellectual and academic world. Examples of possible topics
>for papers include: the origins of language and literature; custom and
>conjecture; Montesquieu; the Scottish Enlightenment; Revolution and the
>origins of society; monarchy; the origin of the virtues; the natural, the
>artificial and the arbitrary; natural religion; social contracts; the
>origins of inequality.
>
>Papers should be no longer than 6,000 words including endnotes, and must
>conform to the FMLS stylesheet, which is available upon request. All
>necessary copyright permissions must be arranged by individual authors in
>advance of publication. The timescale for contributions is as follows: a
>detailed proposal by May 2005; a first draft by 15 November 2005; the
>definitive version by 15 March 2006. Proposals for papers should be sent to
>the editor of the Special Issue: Dr Tom Jones, School of English,
>University of St Andrews, St Andrews Fife KY16 9AL, Scotland. Telephone:
>01334 462648; e-mail: [log in to unmask] Articles which do not find a
>place in the Special Issue will be considered for inclusion in general
>issues of FMLS.
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>___________________________________________________________________________________
>Tom Jones
>School of English
>University of St Andrews
>Fife KY16 9AL
>
>01334 462648
>[log in to unmask]

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