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>
>From:         Prakash Patel <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: Call for papers: Mozart - A Challenge for Literature and Thought
>
>Mozart - A Challenge for Literature and Thought
>
>Call for papers
>
>
>Department of German, School of Modern Languages, Queen Mary, University of
>London
>
>5-7 April 2006
>
>In co-operation with the Ingeborg Bachmann Centre for Austrian Literature
>(School of Advanced Study, University of London), the Austrian Cultural
>Forum , Anglo-Austrian Society, BBC Symphony Orchestra/Education Department
>
>Organizer: Professor Rüdiger Görner, Department of German, School of Modern
>Languages, Queen Mary, University of London ([log in to unmask])
>
>Soon after the composer's death in 1791 the life and works of Wolfgang
>Amadeus Mozart prompted writers to respond to this exceptional artistic
>legacy. According to Reinhart Koselleck  this reaction evidenced that
>Mozart, like Diderot, was regarded as a pathfinder towards a 'new
>subjectivity' in the arts. From Goethe's attempt to write a sequel to the
>libretto of Die Zauberflöte to E.T.A. Hoffmann's, Pushkin's, Kierkegaard's
>and Mörike's  transformations of Mozartian motifs this composer challenged
>literary imagination, philosophical investigation, and even theological
>exploration, to a remarkable extent. Of particular interest is, perhaps,
>Mozart's presence in Delacroix's diaries. In the 20th century literary
>responses to Mozart range from Ernst Bloch, Hermann Hesse to Wolfgang
>Hildesheimer, and Peter Shaffer. In literature, and literary biography,
>Mozart featured as a myth and unattainable measure, the quintessential
>genius and pseudo-naïve buffoon.
>
>This international conference hopes to examine the significance of some of
>these literary reflections on Mozart and discuss what it is that 'das
>Mozartische' represents in literature and whether it can provide a feasible
>category in literary aesthetics. It will address the phenomenon that since
>the Romantic era Mozart has never failed to fascinate writers and
>intellectuals of all kinds and genres but is should also reflect the fact
>that he featured far less prominently in the discourses on (Post-) Modernism
>and cultural theory. In short: Has Mozart's art proved to be
>deconstruction-resistant?
>
>It is hoped that three prominent writers from Britain, Germany and Austria
>will contribute to this conference.
>
>Abstracts of papers (300 words maximum) are invited from scholars and
>literary critics and should reach the organizer ([log in to unmask]) by 1
>June 2005 . Papers should not exceed twenty-five minutes.
>
>Visit: http://www.modern-languages.qmul.ac.uk/mozart/

*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
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Assistant Editor:  Meghan McKinstry
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
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