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>From: Frank Mehring <[log in to unmask]>
>
>Subject: CFP: The German Dimension of American Film (Germany) 
>(3/21/05; 5/19/05-5/22/05)
>
>This is a call for papers for a workshop at the 52nd Annual Conference of the
>German Association of American Studies, "Transatlantic Negotiations" 
>(May 19  to
>22, 2005, in Frankfurt am Main, Germany). The workshop is entitled "'To New
>Shores': The German Dimension of American Film (1920-1959)". The detailed
>description can be found in this email.
>Thank you very much.
>
>Sincerely,
>Frank Mehring
>
>
>To New Shores:
>The German Dimension of American Film, 1920-1959
>Abstract
>
>PD Dr. Stefan L. Brandt (Berlin) und Frank Mehring (Cambridge, Mass.)
>
>This workshop will explore the history and impact of German 
>directors, writers,
>actors, com-posers, and cinematographers who became influential figures in the
>American film industry, from silent film to the late 1950s. Given 
>the fact that
>many important protagonists in 20th cen-tury American film business were of
>German descent ˝ studio bosses like Carl Lömmle, direc-tors like Erich von
>Stroheim, Fritz Lang, Douglas Sirk, F. W. Murnau, and Billy Wilder, writ-ers
>like Bertolt Brecht, composers like Kurt Weill, Max Steiner or Wolfgang
>Korngold ˝, we will ask to what extent this cultural transfer actually formed
>and reshaped the appearance of American popular culture. Did this 
>transfer lead
>to a mutual exchange of ideas? Or was the effect rather one-sided? How did the
>artistic works of German visitors, immigrants, refugees and emigr╚s change
>after they came to the US? Some of these men and women have gone to the United
>States by choice; others have been forced by conditions beyond their control.
>Some have boldly embraced what they perceived to be the ¬American dream of
>progress┤, creating for themselves a new identity, while others have viewed
>American society and values with scathingly critical eyes. One of our main
>interests will be to examine to what extent these views of the United States
>have made themselves felt in Hollywood and Hollywood cinema.
>The workshop will mainly focus on film. However, papers dealing with the
>cultural background of German immigrants in Hollywood from 1920 to 1959  or
>other genres, such as film music, photography, and literature, are also
>welcome. All papers should focus on culture-related issues, with critical
>approaches ranging from film theory to cultural studies.
>Please e-mail proposals for a 15-20-minute presentation by March 21, 2005, to
>either Stefan Brandt, [log in to unmask] or Frank Mehring,
>[log in to unmask] Oral presentations are meant to be brief, intense,
>and controversial. They are intended as a springboard to discussion, not a
>settled issue. Handouts and other audio-visual aids are wel-come.
>
>

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