Print

Print


>
>From: "Nancy Buchwald" <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: CFP: Problems in Holocaust Art (4/12/05; AJS, 12/18/05-12/20/05)
>
>Call for papers for proposed session:  Association for Jewish Studies
>Conference. Dec. 18-20, 2005, Washington, D.C.
>
>
>Centrifugal Forces:  Problems and Issues in Holocaust Art
>
>
>This session will examine the cultural, religious, intellectual, and
>ethical anxieties which surround both the creation and reception of visual
>representations of the Shoah in fine art, whether in painting,
>sculpture, print, multimedia installation, artist's books, performance,
>comix, film, and/or photography.
>
>
>Echoing the Second Commandment prohibition on graven images, many
>scholars, including T. W. Adorno, Saul Friedlander, Geoffrey Hartmann,
>Claude Lanzmann, and Jean-Francois Lyotard, among others have described
>the Holocaust as a singular Event, a complete historical, intellectual and
>theological rupture with the past, including past modes of depiction. 
>Does the Holocaust possess an almost sacred ineffability which deflects
>any representation of it?  Lanzmann famously claimed: "The holocaust is
>unique in that, with a circle of fire, it builds a border around itself,
>which one cannot transgress, because a certain absolute kind of horror
>cannot be conveyed."  Conversely, other scholars such as Sidra DeKoven
>Ezrahi have sought to combat the inward-turning motion of what she terms a
>"centripetal imagination" of the Holocaust with a "centrifugal narrative"
>which "provides an infinity of mobile points of departure and access." 
>Ezrahi's Barthian language proves particularly apt to describe art which
>seeks to record/depict aspects of the Holocaust for different purposes and
>for different audiences-survivors, witnesses/bystanders, perpetrators, and
>second-and third-generation children of survivors.
>
>
>Are depictions of the Holocaust necessarily an ethically corrupt
>practice since the artist must adopt previously established-and therefore
>potentially inauthentic-- pictorial conventions?  Can-and should-the
>apocalyptic incommensurability of the Shoah be re-presented for those who
>never experienced the horror of the camps?  Or do artists have an ethical
>and moral responsibility to create images as a means to witness, mourn and
>work-through the trauma of the Shoah?  Are postmodern strategies of
>irony, distanciation, fragmentation, appropriation, ambiguity, what Janet
>Wolff terms an "art of indirection" most suitable to depictions of the
>Holocaust?
>
>
>
>This session seeks three to four 20 minute papers which explore, from a
>variety of disciplines and methodological perspectives, the problems and
>concerns which artistic representation of the Holocaust incurs for
>either/both creator and beholder. Papers might discuss the topics listed
>below:
>
>
>-- whether nonrepresentational art/abstraction is better suited to the
>depiction of the Shoah than more representational and/or narrative
>styles
>
>
>-- gender in Holocaust art, for instance in the work of Judy Chicago,
>Roee Rosen, Ellen Rothenberg, Charlotte Salomon, and Nancy Spero
>
>
>--an emphasis on haptic/tactile qualities as well as the solicitation of
>the viewer's corporeal response in the work of  Magdalena Abakanowicz,
>Audrey Flack, Gabrielle Rossmer, and Ellen Rothenberg
>
>
>--artist as archivist in the work of Shimon Attie, Christian Boltanski,
>Frederic Brenner, and Rudolf Herz
>
>
>--memorials (such as those at Birkenau, Majdanek and Treblinka) and
>"counter-memorials" to the Holocaust, like Renata Stih and Frieder
>Schnock's Bus Stop-The Non-monument and Rachel Whiteread's Holocaust
>Memorial
>
>
>--the proliferation of Holocaust art which combines word and image,
>especially in the work of children of survivors; papers might discuss
>Alice Lok Cahana, Terezin:  Children's Poem, I Still Believe, Arie Galles'
>Fourteen Stations, Morris Louis, Ben Shahn, Joan Snyder, and Jeffrey
>Wolin
>
>
>--the mobilization by second and third generation artists of Marianne's
>Hirsch's notion of "postmemory" and "identification-at-a distance;"
>artistic and ethical concerns arising from the representation of an
>event/experience to which the artist has no immediate access
>
>
>-- the role of Hollywood films like Judgement at Nuremburg, Schindler's
>List, Life Is Beautiful, and Jakob the Liar in the creation of a popular
>(American) (post)memory of the Holocaust
>
>
>---the impact of institutions like the Holocaust Memorial Museum in
>Washington, D.C. and the Jewish Museum, Vienna and Berlin in embedding
>the Holocaust in the landscape of national memory
>
>
>--how-or should-artists avoid imbuing representations of the Holocaust
>with aesthetic beauty whose enjoyment could potentially temper the art's
>traumatic content; should art about the Holocaust always possess a
>didactic and/or memorial content? Is Janet Wolff right in arguing for the
>role of beauty in Holocaust representation?
>
>
>--Jewish artist's appropriation of Christian symbols like the crucifix
>in order to communicate Jewish suffering in the work of, for instance Marc
>Chagall, Arie Galles, Aharon Gluska, Barnett Newman, and Mark Rothko
>
>
>--the burden of memory and testimony in German art as encompassed in the
>landscapes of Anselm Kiefer
>
>
>--the emergence of the (concentration camp) landscape of torture and
>extermination as body/character in the second-generation art of James
>Friedman, Henning Langenheim, Simcha Shirman, Susan Silas, and Debbie
>Teichholz
>
>
>--the impact of the internet, for example, the newly unveiled website
>which provides a virtual electronic tour of Auschwitz or Vera Frenkel's
>"Body Missing" site
>
>
>Please submit cv and 500 word abstract to [log in to unmask] or mail
>to:
>Nancy Nield Buchwald, 555 Evening St., Worthington OH  43085 by Tues.,
>April 12, 2005.
>

*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
Editor: Stefani Engelstein
Assistant Editor:  Meghan McKinstry
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
Info available at: http://www.missouri.edu/~graswww/resources/gerlistserv.html