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>From: "David D. Kim" <[log in to unmask]>
>
>Subject: CFP: Georg Simmel in Context (grad) (2/15/05; 4/16/05-4/17/05)
>
>Culture and Modernity: Georg Simmel in Context
>The Humanities Center at Harvard University
>Spring 2005
>
>An interdisciplinary graduate student conference hosted by the
>Humanities Center
>at Harvard University on April 16th and 17th, 2005.  The conference seeks to
>disentangle and reshape the paths of Georg Simmelís influence across
>disciplines.
>
>Keynote speaker will be Professor David Frisby of the University of Glasgow,
>Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Applied Social Sciences.
>
>Simmel consciously presents his oeuvre for appropriation and reinterpretation,
>allowing for, even necessitating, its simultaneous perpetuation and
>disappearance.  Unconcerned with bequeathing a unified set of ideas, Simmelóa
>thinker obsessed with originsódenies his own body of thought a
>unified point of
>originary importance.  Against the backdrop of Simmelís effacement and
>versatility, where do we locate his scholarship in the overlapping between
>cultural and social studies?  We encourage graduate students from all
>departments, including economics, history, literature, philosophy, sociology,
>and psychology, to submit their abstracts for papers.  Presentations aim to
>contextualize Simmelís impact on the following topics, but not limited to:
>
>1. Conflict and Creativity: How can we understand Simmelís concept of conflict
>as a binding cultural force fruitful for an interpretation of a world
>characterized by global wars?  How are we to conceive his idea that cultural
>creation is a source of tragic fragmentation?
>2. Urbanism and Life: How do Simmelís perspectives on individuality,
>modernity,
>and urbanism prefigure postmodern engagement with these topics?  To
>what extent
>do we still see the contingencies in the urban space as Simmel delineates in
>ìMetropolis and Mental Lifeî?  How does Simmelís theory of the urban space
>coincide or conflict with other views held by theorists and writers, like
>Walter Benjamin and Alfred D–blin?
>3. Fashion and Society: Where do we observe constructive and
>destructive forces
>within the creation and dissemination of fashion?  In what ways does Simmelís
>insight into fashion at the junction between commodities and practices develop
>into his metaphysics of individuality?
>4. Film and Modernity: How has Simmelís writing helped us understand the
>relationship between film and modernity?  From Simmelís perspective, how do
>film and society engender each other?  Where can one trace Simmelís influence
>on other twentieth-century film scholars, like Siegfried Kracauer?
>5. Money and exchange: During the process of rapidly expanding
>industrialization, where does Simmelís Philosophy of Money (1900) situate the
>modern individual within the culture of exchange and the exchange of cultures?
>How is Simmelís view of capitalism to be contextualized with respect to
>theorists, like Karl Marx, Max Weber and Emile Durkheim?
>6. Religion and Individuality: How does Simmelís theory of religion help us
>understand the tension between the individual and society?  Confronted with
>religious clashes, such as the Middle East conflict, in what ways
>does Simmelís
>concept of religiosity allow or disallow the communion between people(s) with
>ìdifferentî beliefs?
>
>Graduate students from all disciplines are encouraged to submit
>paper abstracts
>of 350ó500 words.  Conference presentations are to be given in English and
>should not exceed 15 minutes, which correspond to papers of 6 to 8 pages
>double-spaced in ordinary type.  Abstracts must be received by February 15th,
>2005.  Notifications of accepted papers will be sent out by March 1stth.
>Please email your abstract as a Word attachment to: [log in to unmask]
>In the body of your email, please include the following: title of paper,
>authors name, institutional and departmental affiliation, email address and
>telephone number.  For further information, please contact Gundela Hachmann
>and/or David Kim at [log in to unmask]
>
>--
>David D. Kim
>Ph.D. Student, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures
>Freshman Proctor, Freshman Dean's Office
>Harvard University
>2669 Harvard Yard Mail Center
>1 Oxford Street
>Cambridge, MA 02138-7516

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