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Don't forget that at  roughly the same time he wrote a review
of Stravinsky's RITES OF SPRING which employed a
myrhical interpretation to explain S.'s EFFECT.

P.
Nancy Gish wrote:

>The phrase "mythical method" is Eliot's from his review of Joyce's _Ulysses-, and HE meant the structure or myth as a unified backdrop for all the disparate material in a modern text.  That was used as a template for then reading Eliot as doing the same by using Jesse Weston as Joyce used Homer.
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>The problem then arose that Eliot actually did not follow Weston in the way Joyce followed Homer.  So it has been a large topic.  Weston is only incidental in TWL and then only in the final section except for a few lines or images that can be read through her or not.
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>The last chapter of my book on TWL is entirely on the "mythical method," and although it was aimed a students and is now dated, I would stand by my argument that the method evacuates meaning as much as fills it because it shifts attention from what is, in fact, the immediate scene.
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>In any case, the starting point needs to be Eliot's own definition--since he was quite precise about what he meant--and the way it was used by early scholars like Cleanth Brooks and Grover Smiith--and how those readings have been reconsidered.  [Perhaps the most detailed example of it is an article by Bud McGrath, who extended the early versions extensively.  But I think he would not read it the same way now.  Nonetheless, it is a concentrated example of the way it was applied.]
>Nancy
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>>>>[log in to unmask] 11/28/04 10:47 PM >>>
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>So then, Mr. Parker, that means that Eliot doesn't mean to allude to the
>myth for the sake of an example or something...but he uses the mythical
>character as a character in TWL. That makes sense and that might prove
>useful when I write my paper.
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>Thanks,
>Advait Praturi
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>>From: "Rickard A. Parker" <[log in to unmask]>
>>Reply-To: "T. S. Eliot Discussion forum." <[log in to unmask]>
>>To: [log in to unmask]
>>Subject: Re: Eliot's Mythical Method
>>Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004 20:42:26 -0500
>>
>>Advait Praturi wrote:
>>
>>
>>>1. To what extent does Eliot implement myth into the Wasteland?
>>>
>>>
>>I've grabbed what I think are some of the significant myths
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>>from TWL and listed them below.  I've left out scripture, Dante
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>>and, for the most part, the English playwrights although I can
>>see a point for classifying them as myths too.
>>
>>1) Sibyl
>>2) Tristan and Isolde
>>3) Hyacinth girl (Hyacinthus)
>>4) Aeneid (via Laquearia)
>>5) Philomel
>>6) Parsifal
>>7) Actaeon and Diana
>>8) Tiresias
>>9) Götterdämmerung
>>10) Voice of the Thunder
>>11) Philomel (Quando fiam uti chelidon)
>>12) Orpheus
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>>What I see as odd here is the level of indirection employed.  Eliot
>>seems to allude to a work that brings up a myth about as much as to
>>a myth itself. That is the case with 1, 2, 6, 7, 9, 11 and 12.  I
>>bet something interesting could be made of that.
>>
>>Regards,
>>    Rick Parker
>>
>>
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