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Marcia Karp wrote:
>
> Kate Troy wrote:
>
> > There was an election and a winner and in a democracy, there is no coo
> > after, just because almost half of the population wanted the other
> > candidate to win.
>
> Certainly not with the hawks around.
>

Let's keep our numbers accurate. Only roughly half the population votes
(I count adult resident population, not just those legally eligible).
And that half splits roughly half & half. Hence practically all our
presidents are elected by roughly 25% of the population (and at least
half of that 25% vote that way because their grandfathers did). So we
are getting down to a very small number of people whose judgment is
relevant to the election.

Clear thinking about numbers in politics is difficult. According to at
least one of the memoirs by Nixon aides the administration had pretty
well made up its mind in the fall of 1969 to use nuclear weapons on the
Chinese installations in North Vietnam through which supplies were
imported. Had they done so, it's iffy whether any of us would be here
today.

What stopped them? About 100,000 people, a very tiny proportion of the
population, who made up the November Moratorium demo in D.C. (Plus the
other several hundred thousand of us who recruited, bankrolled, etc.
those 100,000).)

Most people (in a complex and atomized society) are quite sensibly
pretty passive. If enough of us become active enough against those
hawks, their control of the White House and Congress won't make that
much difference.

It wasn't a "good guy" in office that brought us the Civil Rights Act of
1965. It was that racist reactionary Everett Dirksen, who said it was an
idea whose time had come. What he meant was, it was an idea that was
raising and would raise a hell of a lot of trouble if it wasn't
pacified.

When women stopped raising hell and started to politely lobby
legislators in the mid '70s, the ERA went down to defeat, and with it
the '60s ended.

Carrol

Carrol