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So then, Mr. Parker, that means that Eliot doesn't mean to allude to the
myth for the sake of an example or something...but he uses the mythical
character as a character in TWL. That makes sense and that might prove
useful when I write my paper.

Thanks,
Advait Praturi

>From: "Rickard A. Parker" <[log in to unmask]>
>Reply-To: "T. S. Eliot Discussion forum." <[log in to unmask]>
>To: [log in to unmask]
>Subject: Re: Eliot's Mythical Method
>Date: Sun, 28 Nov 2004 20:42:26 -0500
>
>Advait Praturi wrote:
> >
> > 1. To what extent does Eliot implement myth into the Wasteland?
>
>
>I've grabbed what I think are some of the significant myths
>from TWL and listed them below.  I've left out scripture, Dante
>and, for the most part, the English playwrights although I can
>see a point for classifying them as myths too.
>
>1) Sibyl
>2) Tristan and Isolde
>3) Hyacinth girl (Hyacinthus)
>4) Aeneid (via Laquearia)
>5) Philomel
>6) Parsifal
>7) Actaeon and Diana
>8) Tiresias
>9) Götterdämmerung
>10) Voice of the Thunder
>11) Philomel (Quando fiam uti chelidon)
>12) Orpheus
>
>What I see as odd here is the level of indirection employed.  Eliot
>seems to allude to a work that brings up a myth about as much as to
>a myth itself. That is the case with 1, 2, 6, 7, 9, 11 and 12.  I
>bet something interesting could be made of that.
>
>Regards,
>     Rick Parker

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