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>
>From: Terri He <[log in to unmask]>
>Subject: CFP: Feminist Genealogy and Futurity (grad) (UK) (11/5/04; 12/14/04)
>
>First Seminar
>
>How to Inherit a Monster: Feminist Genealogy and
>Futurity
>Lancaster University, December 14th, 2004
>Abstract Due Date: November 5th, 2004
>
>     In a context which is increasingly defined as
>°*post°¶-feminist, and Women°¶s Studies undergraduate
>programmes are rapidly diminishing, many feminists
>have been left with questions about the legacy and
>futurity of Women°¶s Studies as a discipline. There is
>an abundance of questions pertaining to the direction
>of a politics which is inherited from our foremothers,
>whilst also undergoing a continual revision by new
>generations of feminist scholars. Such questions may
>include; °*might the inheritance of feminist paradigms
>which have reshaped epistemological frameworks in each
>and every academic discipline produce an °*anxiety of
>influence°¶ in current generations of feminist
>scholars?°¶, °*how do feminist scholars negotiate,
>contest or critique theoretical and critical
>perspectives which have exposed the constrictions of a
>patriarchal culture?°¶  and finally, °*how might
>feminist scholarship mediate and embrace our
>responsibilities to an emerging feminist politics in a
>context which continues to greet feminist scholarship
>with suspicion and hostility?°¶
>
>Finding a place within the discipline of Women's
>Studies whilst also appreciating the weight and
>importance of our past can feel both burdensome and
>oddly reassuring. The hybridity which characterizes
>contemporary feminist politics might be encapsulated
>in the figure of the monster, which has been used in
>antiquity to °*demonstrate°¶, to °*show°¶ and perhaps
>crucially, °*to warn°¶.  Of course, the monster is
>also an ambivalent but familiar and powerful figure
>within critical feminist work of the past.  Using the
>category of the monstrous to help demonstrate the
>cultural, social and political warnings which are
>shaping our contemporary political climate, this
>workshop invites papers and participants who might be
>considering the implications of the past whilst being
>concerned about the future.  What has the history of
>Women's Studies as an academic discipline 'shown' us?
>Feeling the burden of this weighty inheritance, how do
>we take account of the journey to date, taking stock
>of our current positions whilst also asking about the
>directions of future journeys? These are intrinsically
>questions about genealogy and futurity.
>
>The day will be made up of workshops and paper
>presentation sessions for which we would encourage you
>to submit an abstract relating to any of the themes or
>issues outlined above.
>
>Please email abstracts by November 5th to Sarah
>Proctor-Thomson [log in to unmask]
>
>Please also feel free to distribute the information
>about the seminar series to any groups or individuals
>that may be interested.
>
>
>Second Seminar
>
>Not Just Sexuality
>The University of York, March 10th 2005 (TBC)
>
>(Further seminar details coming soon)
>
>
>Third Seminar
>
>Women°¶s and Gender Studies in New Times
>The London School of Economics, May 13th 2005 (TBC)
>
>(Further seminar details coming soon)
>
>
>====================================================
>"Where Next for Women°¶s and Gender Studies?" is a
>seminar series organised by postgraduates at the
>universities of Lancaster, York and the London School
>of Economics, in partnership with the Feminist and
>Women°¶s Studies Association (FWSA).  For more
>information about the seminar series please e-mail:
>[log in to unmask], [log in to unmask],
>or [log in to unmask]
>

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