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>Subject: CFP: Cinema in Europe: Networks in Progress (Netherlands)
>(12/31/04; 6/23/05-6/25/05)
>Date: Mon, 27 Sep 2004 12:50:51 +0200
>From: "Valck, M. de" <[log in to unmask]>
>
>CINEMA IN EUROPE: NETWORKS IN PROGRESS
>UNIVERSITY OF AMSTERDAM - JUNE 23-25, 2005
>
>Proposals for 25-30 minutes papers should be submitted as a 200 words =
>abstract by 31 December, 2004 either to Prof. Thomas Elsaesser =
>(elsaesser@ uva.nl) or Dr Eloe Kingma ([log in to unmask]).=20
>
>The European cinema - that of auteurs, national styles and new waves - =
>has traditionally been identified with a dual cultural legacy: that of =
>the 19th novel and of the 20th century artistic avant-gardes. It helped =
>draw a boundary between the work of the great directors, representing =
>the nation, and domestic star and genre cinema, entertaining the masses, =
>while also setting off the 'Europe' of film art against the 'Hollywood' =
>of commerce.=20
>It is a commonplace to note that these legacies and distinctions have =
>proven increasingly untenable over the past decades. But what has =
>replaced the European art- and auteur-cinema, what has become of =
>independent cinema, of 'modern cinema' and how can we best discuss these =
>changes? Is European cinema now part of world cinema in the age of =
>globalisation? Between the festival circuit and late-night television, =
>is there an audience for European films? Has it become a cinema of =
>cities: Paris, Berlin, London, Warsaw, Madrid, Rome, Marseille? Is it =
>the medium for a multicultural Europe and its migrating Multitudes? A =
>cinema of history, place and memory? Cinema in Europe: Networks in =
>Progress aims to explore the new connections, network and nodal points =
>that have emerged in the wake of boundaries overcome and hierarchies =
>overturned. But every re-drawing of the map delineates new divides and =
>demarcations.
>The cinema is a global phenomenon. As an entertainment form and an art =
>of self-expression it attracts some of the most gifted individuals in =
>every country. As a complex industry and a seductive means of =
>communication and persuasion it deeply affects every new generation. Yet =
>the power-relations that sustain it are a-symmetrical, with Hollywood =
>more than ever the dominant player. At the same time, the international =
>dynamics that spotlight a film, a country or a director are cyclical, =
>and the cinema's cultural significance has always been a delicate web of =
>political urgency, passing fashion, and eternal moral verities. If the =
>last twenty years of Hollywood blockbusters have seen the cinema's =
>popularity grow all over the world, Europe, too, has benefited from the =
>trend, if not quite in the same way as Asian cinema or even the popular =
>cinema of the Indian sub-continent. Hence the shifts that have =
>de-centred the old 'national' cinemas are as much external as internal =
>to the cinema and its institutional contexts. Internal factors are the =
>technological changes in production, spearheaded by the digital =
>revolution and underpinned by various national, trans-European and even =
>regional film financing systems, existing in parallel to the box-office =
>and television sales. Exhibition has become dependent on a factor often =
>overlooked: the increasing importance of film festivals. They have =
>become the network nodes for distribution, the interfaces of European =
>talents and world cinema, for they generate and help circulate the =
>cultural capital that gives a film media attention and exposure.
>External factors for the changing media landscape shaping European =
>cinema include the contested nature of the contemporary nation state, =
>the emergence of a 'Europe of the regions and the capitals', the =
>expansion of the European Union eastwards, and the demographic =
>transformation of Europe's populations into multi-ethnic and =
>multi-cultural communities. Taken together, these factors are a =
>work-in-progress on the very definition of Europe in respect to its =
>geopolitical position, economically still one of the epicentres of the =
>global economy, but now also often seemingly at the margins of major =
>cultural and political developments. Cautious and conservative, European =
>citizens have on the whole been slow to respond to the often virulent =
>identity-politics of populations elsewhere. Yet as so often in the past, =
>the cinema has been a sensitive and acute barometer, responding to the =
>new demographics that are re-centering Europe around the Mediterranean =
>and the East. These new audiences are also putting pressure on the =
>cinema, demanding new media representations that reflect both their old =
>ethnic identities and their new self-definitions as global citizen.
>Cinema in Europe: Networks in Progress will look at the consequences of =
>these changes by rethinking the habitual notions of nationally specific =
>film cultures and their distinct authorial or stylistic signatures. =
>Participants are encouraged to suggest new conceptual tools, propose new =
>maps of the cinematic terrain - mainstream, avant-garde and independent =
>- and establish new links within European media-scapes and media-spaces, =
>as well as between European and world cinema.
>The conference takes place over three days and is organised by the =
>Amsterdam School of Cultural Analysis (ASCA), in cooperation with the =
>Department of Media and Culture, University of Amsterdam. Possible =
>topics and panels include:
>       *       New authorship studies
>       *       National Cinemas and New Waves
>       *       Cinephilia: Classics, Cults, Markets
>       *       European Animation Film
>       *       Re-Mapping  the 'Old' and  'New' Europe: Central and
>Eastern European =
>Cinema after 1989
>       *       Americanising Europe or Europeanising Hollywood?=20
>       *       Memory, Heritage, Literature and European Cinema
>       *       Festivals, Film Financing, Media Policy
>       *       European Stars and Genre Cinema
>       *       Puttnam, Eichinger, Zentropa, Canal +: More Power to Producers?
>       *       Documentary Europe
>       *       Digital Europe
>       *       Diaspora Cinema and the New Cosmopolitans
>       *       European Cinema, the Museum and the Avant-garde
>       *       Theologies in Film
>       *       Europe's Cinematic Cities
>

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