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I went up to stockton lake today hoping to find at least a little shorebird habitat and ultimatly some shorebirds.  Well there was zero habitat and as a result zero shorebirds.  If the lake were to drop just 6 in. to a foot there would probably be plenty of mudflats at the aldrich area but not yet.  I birded the area around the parking lot and found:

VESPER SPARROW- 1 this bird was in a small short grass area between the parking lot and the bridge mixed in with two savannah sparrows.  The bird was just 12 feet away and gave great looks, the rufous sholders were very visible as well as the white outer tail feathers.
LARK SPARROW- 1 this bird flew up from the grass in one of the nearby fields and perched not 20 feet away in a line of trees for a minute giving great looks as well.
CLIFF SWALLOW- They have returned in force to their nests at the bridge and were swarming the whole area.

only waterbirds were 3 canadiens, 3 pelicans, blue winged teal, great blue herons, one PB grebe, and a few cormorants.  One Parula was heard and tree and barn swallows were also seen.

Along 123 to stockton lake I had another SCISSOR-TAILED FLYCATCHER.

No shorebirds but two missouri birds (both sparrows) and a great day to get out!

matt andrews
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