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Just briefly:  there's also a (once) well-known edition by John Frederick
Nims that was issued through Collier in 1965 (and which, appropriately
enough, includes on its cover Pound's estimation that Golding's is "the most
beautiful book in the language"). Nims used to teach at U of I at Chicago,
and was also a poet in his own right.  One wonders if Pound ever got around
to looking at Nims' edition.  Nims' introduction begins with a
taking-to-task of some supposed misreadings of Golding by Pound.  The
edition's worth a look if you can find it.

Jeremy Sharp
Department of English
York University

----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Seddon" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Saturday, February 21, 2004 2:29 PM
Subject: Re: Integrated volumes


> Carrol
>
> This thread seems to be wandering a bit but the following might be of
> interest concerning Ovid.
>
> Raphael Lyne's "Ovid's Changing World" (Oxford Univ P, 2001) gives an
> outstanding review of the translation history of Ovid and includes an
entire
> section on Arthur Golding's translation.
>
> For those interested in Golding,  the Ovid Shakespeare reportedly used,
> Golding's translation has been fairly recently republished: "Ovid's
> Metamorphoses: Translated by Arthur Golding".  (John Hopkins Univ Press,
> 2002)  edited and introduced by Madeleine Forey.   Forey's  introduction
is
> very helpful.
>
> Ted Hughes published "Tales From Ovid" (Farrar Straus Giroux, New York,
> 1997,
>
> Mary Innes published a prose version with Penguin Books "The Metamorphoses
> of Ovid" in 1955
>
> Loeb publishes an English  translation with facing Latin in two volumes.
>
> Comparing the four is a fascinating activity and those of you who have
Latin
> should enjoy the Loeb immensely to my considerable jealousy.
>
> In "Guide to Kulchur" page 249 Pound states "Golding made a new Ovid"
>
> Raphael Lyne tells how Golding changes Ovid; "He begins by metamorphosing
> Ovid by turning the sophisticated Roman into a ruddy country gentleman
with
> tremendous gusto and a gift for energetic doggerel".(Lyne, 20)
>
> Lyne's point, which probably also attracted Pound, was that Golding
> metamorphosesed (my word) "Metamorphoses".
>
> Lyne also points out that Golding introduce dialect into a text that was
> originally written in dialect free literary Latin.  (see Foley's edition
of
> Golding page 333 for an example of this) Dialect was an automatic
attraction
> to Pound.
>
> Sister Bernetta Quinn said "Repeatedly he (Pound) emphasizes the fact that
> Golding created a new Ovid and that knowledge of how he did so is
> indispensable to an understanding of English (or any other division of)
> literature.  (Quinn, pg 16)
>
> Given the importance of Golding's translation of  "Metamorphosis" to
English
> language literature I recommend Foley's edition highly.  A quick read of
> Lyne's section on Golding would be very helpful.
>
> Rick Seddon
> McIntosh, NM