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Thanks, Richard.
Perhaps, the Hamlet essay could be defined as the Mona Lisa of criticism...
;-)
Simply, Eliot writes that Hamlet's feelings 'out-Herod Herod' -- somehow
they're too strong as compared to what caused them. I have read many an
essay about Hamlet in Eliot's poetry, speaking about the figure of the fool
up to that of Osric... Yet, none of them ever really convinced me.
I've always felt that what really annoyed Eliot was that Hamlet can be a
very verbose play in a way. Eliot's early poetry tends to be essential, even
TWL. Each and every word is studied and thought upon. And this is valid for
images (that is, objective correlatives), also. Eliot's chains of images are
extremely complicated and neat in his early poetry.
All the best,
Sara


----- Original Message -----
From: "Richard Seddon" <[log in to unmask]>
To: <[log in to unmask]>
Sent: Tuesday, February 03, 2004 3:28 PM
Subject: Re: Hamlet and Pound (et al.)


> Sara
>
> W. H. Auden's "Lectures on Shakespeare", (Princeton Univ P, Princeton,
> 2000).
>
> I have always been curious as to why T. S. Eliot saw "Hamlet" as an
example
> of a poet not controlling emotion properly in the work and saw
"Coriolanus"
> as one of Shakespeare's better works.  How did Shakespeare provide
> "objective correlatives"  better in "Coriolanus" than in "Hamlet" or did
he?
> I think an investigation along these lines would perhaps reveal a little
> more about what TSE thought about the "objective correlative" and about
what
> TSE thought of Shakespeare in general.
>
> Rick Seddon
> McIntosh, NM