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>
>
>German-American Connections
>The 6th Annual German Studies Graduate Student Conference
>at the University of Wisconsin-Madison
>
>April 2 and 3, 2004
>
>Keynote Speaker:
>Carol Poore
>Professor of German Studies
>Brown University
>German/American bodies politic: A look at some current biocultural debates.
>
>
>Connections between  the German-speaking world and the United States go
>back more than 300 years. These ties have often been complex and at times
>problematic. This conference will provide an interdisciplinary forum in
>which to discuss such connections, both past and present. Departments of
>History, Foreign Languages, Linguistics, Comparative Literature,
>Philosophy, Geography, Political Science, Foreign Language Education and
>Art History are encouraged to participate. The conference will focus on
>German-American connections in the following areas:
>
>Literature and Culture
>The United States and Canada have been both a place of utopia and of
>disappointment for German writers. Conversely, for North Americans looking
>back provides insights into common ground as well as differences. While
>seemingly disconnected at times cultural debates in both regions have
>always influenced one another.
>Possible topics include: The transfer and conflict of views and ideas in
>past/present cultural and political debates, America as seen by German
>authors, Germany as seen by American authors, and authors in emigration and
>exile.
>
>Migration and Society
>The US embassy in Germany states The achievements and contributions of
>German-Americans have had a profound effect on making the United States the
>country it is today.  This area focuses on the past and present influences
>these countries have had on each other through migration.
>
>Linguistics
>The historical and cultural connections between German-speaking countries
>and the United States have had a definite impact on both languages over the
>years. How has German immigration influenced regional varieties of American
>English? How have varieties of German spoken in the United States developed
>and been maintained over time? How is the German language understood and
>perceived in the United States, and conversely, how has the influence of
>English been received in the German-speaking world?
>
>Second Language Acquisition/ Foreign Language Pedagogy
>Comparing and building connections between cultures has become an
>increasingly important component in many foreign language curricula,
>including German. How can one effectively help students compare German
>speaking cultures with their own? What role do linguistic aspects such as
>pragmatics play in the teaching of language and culture?
>
>Abstracts of no more than 250 words must be received by Friday, January 30,
>2004. Submissions should not bear the author's name. Please include the
>following information as a separate attachment: name, title of paper,
>department and university affiliation if applicable, address, phone number,
>and e-mail address. Papers should not exceed 20 minutes in length (8-10
>pages).
>
>Please send abstracts by mail:
>
>Carrie Jackson and Jürgen Schaupp
>Department of German
>University of Wisconsin
>818 Van Hise Hall
>1220 Linden Dr.
>Madison, WI 53706
>
>or by e-mail:
>
>
>Visit our website at
>http://www.sit.wisc.edu/~gdgsa/conference.2004
>

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*******************
The German Studies Call for Papers List
Editor: Stefani Engelstein
Assistant Editor:  Karen Eng
Sponsored by the University of Missouri
Info available at: http://www.missouri.edu/~graswww/resources/gerlistserv.html