Print

Print


Dear Sara, First, in a general sense, I agree with you about this list, and I am not interested in being monitored. But: Do you think there is a difference between being fierce about ideas and simply making personal attacks? Having been the target of many nasty remarks (many of which did not seem to elicit comparable concern--though some did), I can say that it is more than tiresome to be personally assaulted by someone one does not even know. On the other hand, intense disagreement on ideas is fascinating. I think Steve's reading, for example, does not work, but a case could be made for the "ought" meaning of "should" not being avoidable. In this case, I do think there are two issues: I also am not interested in Kate's (or anyone's) private life distributed on the web like the log of Michael Doonesbury's hip daughter, and I also find it annoying. But I think Steve's annoyance might have been stated with less personal attack. Since most people on this list know nothing at all about each other except the kind of things they post, I never do understand the sudden eruption of personal animosity. Cheers, Nancy Date sent: 0000,0000,8000Sun, 5 Oct 2003 17:53:43 +0200 Send reply to: 0000,0000,8000"T. S. Eliot Discussion forum." <<[log in to unmask]> From: 0000,0000,8000Sara Trevisan <<[log in to unmask]> Subject: 0000,0000,8000OT Outlets To: 0000,0000,8000[log in to unmask] You know? I was once subscribed to an Italian mailing list on literary translation where nobody could say anything which might accuse another of having done a mistake, because respect was required always, and any objections was considered as offensive (no matter one's politeness). Well, that list was unbearable -- it sounded like some tea-room from the Victorian age, where everybody would try to please everybody. I love this list, because when it happens, each one can have one's outlet, if he/she likes, and then things go back to normality through a simple question about TSE. This list has no hypocrisy. Of course, always within the limits of politeness. Sara --