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>
>The Graduate Students of the Department of German, Russian and
>Eastern European Languages and Literatures at Rutgers University are
>announcing a call for papers for their 4th annual interdisciplinary
>Conference to be held on April 2nd 2004 in New Brunswick, New
>Jersey.   We welcome abstracts from graduate students and scholars
>from the humanities and social sciences.
>
>
>Beyond Oedipus : Multidisciplinary Approaches to the Father
>The role of a father or father figure has been considered a crucial
>element in both the phylogenetic and individual human development.
>From Heraklit’Äôs notion of ’Äúwar as father of all’Äù until
>today’Äôs still influential concepts of Vater Staat, Landesvater,
>Vaterland (patria) etc., the male element in family that we call
>Father continues to be considered an existential and determining
>factor for the maturation of daughter and son alike.  Therefore, the
>absence or weakness of the father in literature has often brought
>about despair and catastrophe.  Freud developed his version of the
>’ÄúOedipus Complex’Äù in which the male child fantasizes the
>destruction of his father from Sophocles's tragedy in which Oedipus
>is fated to fulfill the oracle's prediction that he will murder his
>father.  However, challenging the father is not only performed by
>sons and not only in order to get hold of the mother. Yet, the
>circle of adopting gender or role identification within this
>traditio!
>  n has been hard or impossible to break for all involved. It is only
>in 19th and early 20th centuries that various factors, such as
>industrialization, World War I, the women's and youth movements and
>psychoanalysis triggered a questioning and re-definition of gender
>roles and the concepts of masculinity, especially the masculinity
>within the entity of the family.  Expressionism ended up becoming
>the official mouthpiece for this enterprise.  The Revolution of 1968
>and the Women’Äôs Movement provided daring and threatening
>alternatives to traditional family values, roles and traditions.
>We invite papers that offer new theoretical frameworks to further
>this discussion of the paternal realm and explore and polemicize the
>role of the father in the millennial age. This one day event is
>intended to provide a plenum for interactive and collaborative
>exchange.
>
>Topics can include:
>’Ä¢   The Father as Literary and Cinematic Topos’Ä¢   The
>Totalitarian Father’Ä¢   Theology and the Father’Ä¢   Psychic,
>Cultural and Political Enactments of Fatherhood’Ä¢   Paternal
>Postures and Colonialism’Ä¢   Citizenship and Fatherhood’Ä¢
>Fatherlessness and the Crisis of Fatherhood’Ä¢   The Commodification
>of Fathers: Fatherhood in the Age of Reproductive Anonymity’Ä¢
>Paternity in the Hands of Women’Ä¢   The Father in different
>cultures and societies’Ä¢   The Father in discourse analysis’Ä¢
>Filmic and Visual Representations of the Father’Ä¢   Fatherhood and
>Masculinity: Being a father is a man’Äôs preserve ’Ä¢
>Deconstructing the Father and Postmodern Re-inscriptions of the
>Father
>
>Presentations will be 20 minutes in length.  Please send
>questionsand/or 250-word abstracts by December 1st, 2003 to Kai
>Artur Diers, at [log in to unmask] . Please copy the abstract in
>your e-mail message text and do not send it as an attachment


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The German Studies Call for Papers List
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