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>Charles Closmann (German Historical Institute, Washington, DC)
>Christof Mauch (German Historical Institute, Washington, DC),
>Washington D.C. 6.-9.05.2004, GHI
>Deadline: 15.01.2004
>
>
>“War and the Environment:  Contexts and Consequences of Military
>Destruction in the Modern Age”
>
>Conference at the German Historical Institute, Washington, DC
>Date: May 6-9, 2004
>
>Conveners:
>Charles Closmann (German Historical Institute, Washington, DC)
>Christof Mauch (German Historical Institute, Washington, DC)
>
>
>Wars have had major impacts on urban and natural environments. As a
>consequence of military campaigns and destruction, landscapes and
>cityscapes have been transformed, oceans and air have been polluted. At
>the same time, environmental factors, such as climate and the
>availability of resources, have influenced military strategies and the
>conduct of war. Some wars have been fought in order to gain access to
>natural resources.  Others have been compared with natural events.
>
>Our conference invites historians and social scientists to explore the
>nexus of environment and war from multiple perspectives. It seeks to
>bring together historians of culture, environment, technology,
>economics, etc. whose work deals with war, particularly since the onset
>of industrialization, anywhere in the world. We invite proposals
>addressing some of the following topics and questions:
>
>  -   What immediate and long-term environmental consequences have wars
>and the use of modern destructive weapons had on nature (land, air, and
>sea) and natural resource policies?  In what ways have such factors as
>nuclear radiation, pollution, toxification, and military installations
>(landmines etc.) contributed to the transformation of landscapes? How
>have they influenced agriculture and transportation?
>
>  -   To what extent and in what ways have sites and installations of war
>(battlefields, fortifications, etc.) influenced the environmental and
>cultural alteration of landscapes?
>
>  -   How has war affected urban environments (water supplies,
>transportation systems etc.), cityscapes, and patterns of settlement?
>What lessons did urban planners learn from wars, and how did they apply
>their experience in postwar reconstruction? To what extent did they take
>the prevention of future environmental damage into consideration?
>
>  -   What types of environmental damage have military planners taken
>into account?  How have the public and media reacted? To what extent has
>the growing awareness of environmental damage led to new legal
>regulations and military concepts in the course of the 20th century?
>
>  -   What consequences have resulted from the storage of hazardous
>wastes at military sites?  How have legal systems evolved to remediate
>toxic waste sites and compensate nearby residents—or soldiers—exposed to
>such materials? What military and legal discourses, and what policies
>have evolved in regard to burning oil wells, oil spills, and similar
>environmental disasters?
>
>  -   What are the connections between war, science, and the environment?
>How has this complex relationship evolved over time?
>
>  -   How has nature (or, for that matter, the social and cultural
>constructions of nature) been used to justify military aggression,
>conquest, and resistance? What role have comparisons between war and
>nature, or natural and military disasters, etc. played in politics and
>ideology? In turn, what military terms and strategies have been applied
>in environmental campaigns, for instance against ocean flooding, the
>“bio-invasion” of non-native species, etc.?
>
>
>Proposals that deal with a variety of these issues, and papers that
>focus on comparisons (over time or between different wars) are
>especially welcome. However, we shall also accept case studies that
>address broader analytical questions about the relationship between war
>and the environment. Successful applicants will be invited to present
>their work at the German Historical Institute in Washington, DC.
>
>Applications must be received by January 15, 2004. They should include a
>proposal not longer than 500 words and a brief CV.
>
>Please send applications to: [log in to unmask] or send a fax to the
>German Historical Institute (202)-483-3430.

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