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>
>Call for Papers
>New Directions in Critical Theory:
>The Borders, Territories, and Frontiers Conference
>April 8-10, 2004
>University of Arizona
>
>An address by Hortense Spillers, Frederick J. Whiton Professor of English at
>Cornell University, will open the conference.
>
>Professor Spillers, one of the most distinguished African American feminist
>and psychoanalytic theorists working in America today, has been a central,
>critical figure in the areas of African American letters, African diasporic
>literature, cultural criticism and literary theory.  Her work includes,
>_Black, White, and In Color: Essays on American Literature and Culture_ and
>two edited volumes, _Comparative American Identities: Race, Sex, and
>Nationality in the Modern Text_, and _Conjuring: Black Women, Fiction, and
>Literary Tradition_.  She is currently working on _In the Flesh_, which will
>consider points of intersection between Black American women's history and
>feminist inquiry and _The Eagle Stirs Her Nest_, a work that examines the
>rhetoric of black sermons preached and/or written before W.W.I.
>
>The 2004 New Directions in Critical Theory Conference, an interdisciplinary
>graduate student forum at the University of Arizona, will focus on "Borders,
>Territories, and Frontiers."   We read "Borders, Territories, and Frontiers"
>broadly - in all of its concrete and metaphoric manifestations.  This theme
>evokes Southwestern history, literature, and film, points to the local
>politics of Southern Arizona, border towns, areas, and regions, and
>resonates with the emotive force of our national myths: notions of the
>frontier and manifest destiny.  In post 9/11 America and the greater, global
>world, such terms also connote the hegemonic paradigms and critical concerns
>central to social, cultural, and humanistic inquiry: globalization,
>multiculturalism, political economies, transnationalism, feminism,
>antiracist struggle, and liberal identity.  In the academy itself, such
>concepts encourage border-crossings between departments, prompt us to
>question the theoretical methodologies and analytic frameworks we employ,
>encourage us to redefine, problematize, or even liberate existing bodies of
>knowledge, and increase our understanding of diversity and similarity across
>various fields of study.
>
>We invite graduate students from any discipline to present
>theoretically-oriented scholarship that interrogates the social formation
>and maintenance of borders, posits means for transgressing, resisting, or
>subverting boundaries, and in so doing, works to re-envision existing
>territories or incite new frontiers of meaning.
>
>Topics for BORDERS, TERRITORIES, and FRONTIERS might include but are not
>limited to:
>
>Global/Local Politics
>Postcolonialism/Multiculturalism/Globalization
>Tourism /Travel Writing/Advertising
>History/Tourism/Architecture
>Architecture/Geography/Memory
>History/Life Writing/(Re)membering
>Memory & Identity
>National/Cultural/Racial/Sexual/Gendered/Class Identity
>Hybridity & Identity
>Hybridity & Embodiment
>Borders of the Human
>Exteriority/Interiority
>Peripheral Zones/Contact Zones
>The Rhetoric of Borders, Territories, Frontiers
>Barriers/Communities/Home
>Space/Mobility/Displacement
>Immigration/Othering/Alienation
>Borders & Criminality
>The Southwest in Film, History, & Literature
>Ranching/Ecology
>New Frontiers & Scientific or Spatial Studies
>Science & Technology Studies
>Virtual Borders, Territories, or Frontiers
>Cyberspace & Virtual Bodies
>Genders/Sexualities/Cyborgs
>Popular Culture/High Culture
>Consumerism/Media/Identity
>Subjectivity/Experience/Identity
>Sex & Economy
>Violence/Sexuality/Desire
>Heteronormativity/Homosexuality/Transsexuality
>Feminist Theory & Queer Theory
>Psychoanalytic Theory & Feminist Theory
>Critical Race Theory & Psychoanalysis
>Spirituality & Subjectivity
>Performativity/Self-Fashioning
>Texts, Bodies, & Spectacle
>Bodies of /and Knowledge
>Intellectual Traditions & Interdisciplinarity
>Diversity, Similarity, & the Academy
>Language/Literacy/Opportunity
>Translation/Appropriation/Adaptation
>Texts, Contexts, & the Web
>Theory & the Classroom
>Teaching & Service Learning
>The Academy & Activism
>
>We particularly welcome submissions attending to race, gender, class,
>ethnicity, sexuality, material culture, media and film studies, feminist
>studies, performativity, corporeality, and visuality.  Please submit 100-250
>word individual abstracts or panel proposals, comprised of a 100-250 word
>abstract for the entire panel and one 100-250 word abstract for each paper.
>Include names, email addresses, mailing addresses, institutional
>affiliations, technology requests, paper titles with abstracts by January
>15, 2004 to:
>
>April Huff (Women's Studies) & Wendy Weise (Department of English)
>Conference Co-Chairs
>Modern Languages Building, Room 445
>University of Arizona
>Tucson, Arizona 85721
>(620) 621-1836
>[log in to unmask]
>
>If you should have any questions or concerns, please contact Wendy Weise &
>April Huff at [log in to unmask]

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