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dear Jim,
  Funny you should bring up the echo of "Let us go then" Indeed, I see a really powerful echo in swinburne's "A Leave Taking" (the poem of unrequited love of the 19th century) --"Let us go thence (our songs she will not hear)"--this is a refrain that repeats throughout the poem as does Eliot's refrain and the male narrator's drowning at the end of both poems.
Cassandra

-----Original Message-----
From: "Loucks, James" <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Date: Tue, 16 Sep 2003 07:40:59 -0400
Subject: Re: query: Eliot and the sea

Cassandra: Your line of inquiry is fascinating, especially in light of TSE's expressed disdain for Swinburne (and Shelley and Browning). I think TSE's debt to the Romantics and Victorians is deeper than he was ever willing to acknowledge. Interesting too that Pound's review of Prufrock volume cites Browning as an influence (or precursor?). It wasn't until 1936 that TSE allowed as how Tennyson had his merits.

Has anyone noticed that "The Love Song of J. Alfred" begins with Browningseque abruptness that recalls RB's "Andrea del Sarto": "But do not let us quarrel any more..."; cf. : "Let us go then, you and I...."  -- Jim

        -----Original Message-----
        From: Cassandra Laity [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
        Sent: Mon 15-Sep-03 6:53 PM
        To: [log in to unmask]
        Cc:
        Subject: query: Eliot and the sea



        Can anyone direct me to some good articles on the meaning of the sea in Eliot? I am researching for an article on swinburne and Eliot that focuses on complexes of wind/sea often with images of snow, frost, flowers--all classic swinburnian images.
        Cassandra


        Professor Cassandra Laity
        Co-Editor, _Modernism/Modernity_
        English Department
        Drew University
        Madison, NJ 07940
        Phone: 973-408-3141
        Fax: 973-408-3040




Professor Cassandra Laity
Co-Editor, _Modernism/Modernity_
English Department
Drew University
Madison, NJ 07940
Phone: 973-408-3141
Fax: 973-408-3040