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The same thought has occurred to me, being a new birder I often find lifers,
i.e. my first summer tanager pair, an indigo bunting I spent two days trying
to find, in normal areas.  Within 1 mile of my home there are 40 different
types of birds.  There are, however, not many shore birds, in Strafford.  I
would like to have a survey of the birds in my county, and perhaps the 5-10
hottest spots that I could take birders and show them a lifer.  I recently
had a friend visit from Virginia and he had only seen a meadowlark one time
and the dickissel was a first.  (I showed it to him but identified it as an
immature meadowlark, I thought his song would change as he got older).  We
were both thrilled when a wood thrush landed about 50 feet away, in our
view, and sang for several minutes.

After a hay field was bailed one afternoon we observed 8 different birds
feeding on the dislodged bugs in about 3o minutes, my first orchard oriole,
the indigo's, phoebe's, Eastern Kingbirds, bluebirds, scissor-tailed
flycatcher, barn swallows and something else I suspect was the female
orchard oriole.  What a spectacle.  The hawk swooping down to take a mangled
snake and the vultures and crows prowling around.

There must be undiscovered local areas that can be birded with great results
and perhaps the occasional, rare viewing or lifer

Sorry to ramble

Don Dorey, Strafford, MO

-----Original Message-----
From: MO Wild Bird Forum [mailto:[log in to unmask]]On Behalf Of
Edge Wade
Sent: Tuesday, August 05, 2003 9:59 AM
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: Birder behavior


This was on the AZ listserv.  A subsequent entry noted that the Becards
have not been absent, but agreed and furthered the basic comment.

Are we neglecting "underbirded" areas in Missouri because of our
flocking behavior?  Do we have enough birders out there checking little
known "odd spots" and reporting on them?  Have you checked a new spot
this year?

What say ye?

Edge Wade
Missouri Bird Alert compiler
[log in to unmask]

Subject: Roadside Rest effect
From: Richard Carlson <rccarl AT PACBELL.NET>
Date: Mon, 4 Aug 2003 11:00:14 -0700

An unfortunate result of modern birding is the concentration of birders
at a
few locations.  Roadside Rest near Patagonia AZ is a classic example of
this.  It's a reststop where a Rose-throated Becard was first seen
decades
ago.  Ever since, EVERYONE stops there.  The Becard is there once again,
after a 5 year hiatus.

The problem is that other places are under-birded and under-reported.
There
should be a requirement that everyone try and report a new birding spot
once
a month or we'll never learn anything new.

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