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Also perhaps pertinent is the scene in Dr. Zhivago -- if you've seen the film -- where Zhivago is first seen by his brother, stipping wood from a fence (apparently bounding a lot) to burn.

Tom K

In a message dated 6/13/2003 12:20:42 PM Eastern Standard Time, [log in to unmask] writes:

>
>
> Sara,
> to build on what Mr. Gray tells us:
>
> This is a poem of the pre-jazz era western world; electricity was more than
> rare and it certainly wasn't used for heating.  Cars were also rare (and so you
> are correct in assuming they aren't picking up petrol on the pavement).
> The image you can think of is twofold.  If you have seen _Monty Python's The
> Search For the Holy Grail_, you can think of the silly characters who are
> collecting mud (and imagine them gathering peat or wood or something)--
> Or you can think of bent-back peasants picking up coal scraps from the lots
> where the coal trucks (or carriages) parked.  When the coal trucks moved,
> precious coal fell out.  This is covered in the movie _My Left Foot_ when the poor
> Irish would go into the streets as the truck passed and
> collect the fallen
> coal they could not afford.
> My guess is that Eliot was thinking of the latter.
> Pax et Lux,
> Michael Palmer