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That's why I'm posting to this list.  I was surprised to see a Common Ground Dove.  I checked through all of my books to find a comparison.  The dove was no more than 50 feet from my back window and I used my binoculars to try to find out as much information as I could.  What kept throwing me was the very clear white tip on the short tail.  My question is, would an adult mourning dove continually try to mount a juvenile morning dove?  And would a mourning dove interbreed with a very similar species?  Such as a Common Ground Dove?  I must have sat at my window for 45 minutes each time trying to see the flight feathers to positively identify this bird but never could.  I had to leave to fix dinner, help with homework, etc., etc., etc., but could never see the flight feathers on the wings, nor clearly see the bill.  But I clearly saw the white tip on the short tail and the size of the bird.  The belly and breast seemed to be more of a lighter buff color than the mourning dove next to it and the feet seemed more of a pink color.  But it was the tail that first attracted me.  The two sitting side by side, there was clearly a difference.  If anyone wants to come out here to look for it, they are welcome to.  There is a common area off to the backside of my property that they are welcome to explore and anyone is welcome to enter through my yard as long as they shut the gate.  But I need to notify my neighbors if anyone is interested in coming out as a few weeks ago we had a break in during the day.  They caught the fellow but all of us are a little sensitive to strangers wondering around the neighborhood . If it was an Inca Dove, isn't the tail longer and the rust wing color noticible on the outside of the wing as it sits? Cathi Luytjes, St. Charles, MO, [log in to unmask]

Robert Fisher <[log in to unmask]> wrote:Are you sure you did not see a juvenile Mourning Dove? They can fly when
still quite small, and their tails are short and squared off at first.
Common Ground Doves are really very tiny birds in comparison to adult
Mourning Doves, although their plumage, like that of young Mourning Doves,
is superficially similar. It would make more sense for an adult Mourning
Dove to be paying attention to young of its own species than to a tiny bird
of a different species.

Bob Fisher
Independence, Missouri
[log in to unmask]
----- Original Message -----
From: "Cathi Luytjes"
To:
Sent: Tuesday, May 06, 2003 4:18 PM
Subject: Common Ground Dove


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> I had what appeared to be a Common Ground Dove in my back yard. She was
being courted by a Mourning Dove. I did not see her flight feathers as she
spent the better part of the evening either running around on the ground
because she was being chased by the Mourning Dove, or sitting on a branch.
I never saw her fly, but she was smaller than the Mourning Dove with short
tail feathers tipped in white. Are these usually found in this area? I
thought they were from the deep south. Cathi Luytjes, St. Charles, MO,
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