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From: Pietros Maneos

In a message dated 5/20/2003 3:46:38 PM Eastern Standard Time,
[log in to unmask] writes:
>Gertrude Stein (around 1920), be the future of the barbarians
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What did Eliot think of Stein?  Where did he state his opinion of her?
Essay? Conversation? Letter?
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Sorry. You haven't supplied enough of the text for me
to identify if those are my words originally, or my words in someone else's
context, or someone else's words. I don't remember attributing to Eliot
anything about Stein. You may have misread read or I may have mis-expressed
my point, or someone else may have mis-quoted me. Her work, and its
influence on Hemingway speak for themselves. I could well believe
Eliot had some choice but subtle words about her. You might check
his commentaries in THE CRITERION. While Virginia Woolf seems to get
all the attention as THE female writer of Modernism, Stein deserves
at least a glance in, to see what's going on. For some, her work
is useless and trivial; for others its boldly experimental.

Cheers,
Peter