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Let us go, through certain half-deserted streets,
The muttering retreats
Of restless nights in one-night cheap hotels
And sawdust restaurants with oyster-shells:
Streets that follow like a tedious argument
Of insidious intent
To lead you to an overwhelming question...
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For the grammarians and poetry analysts (not mutually exclusive, of course)
on the list:

Is it the "streets" or the "tedious argument of insidious intent" that will
"lead you to an overwhelming question"? The colon after "oyster-shells"
followed immediately by the word "streets" seems to put the emphasis on
"streets". In other words, does the grammar support either of these two
readings:

Reading I) Here's two things about those streets:
  a) Let us go through streets that follow like a tedious argument of
insidious intent
  b) Let us go though streets to lead you to an overwhelming question...

Reading II) Here's two things about those tedious arguments:
     Streets that follow like
  a) a tedious argument of insidious intent
  b) a tedious argument to lead you to an overwhelming question...


It matters because if it's the (unspecified) "tedious argument" the leads to
the overwhelming question, we don't have much information about the nature of
the argument. However, if it's the streets that lead to the overwhelming
question, we know it is the sleazy part of town, that is, sex, that is
leading to the overwhelming question.

Thoughts?

-- Steve --