Print

Print


Ken Armstrong wrote:

> Ditto to Steve and Rick. Do we assume that TSE made a mistake?
> Inquiring minds want to know...

What you me "we" Kemo Sabe?  I haven't given it much thought and
probably won't for awhile but I'll give a couple of guesses hoping
that others might too. I'll choose from 1 and 2.  I think 3 and 4
are unlikely reasons.

1) He preferred the sound.
2) He wanted to keep the speech natural sounding.
3) He made an unnoticed mistake.
4) He wanted something strange sounding to make the reader feel like
he was the "you" (I suggestion I posed but one that I can't whole-
heartly agree with.)


Nancy Gish wrote:

> IF the apposition is to "us," who or what is the subject of the sentence?

That might depend on the magic in the word "let."  Is the default
subject of "let" some unnamed power?  In other languages a subject is
not always needed.  In Russian I believe you can just say "rains"
instead of "it rains" or "it is raining" where "it" is just a
placeholder for a subject that habit says we must insert.


I don't think I'd write many more posts on this subject but to carry
on just a little more: I don't know the situation about a hundred
years ago but I think that now there is much confusion about what case
to use when applying what I'll call the "polite rule" of mentioning
yourself last.  I think I was being too subtle the other day purposely
using "my wife and I" where the objective case was needed.  Without
the inclusion of the second person I would agree with Nancy that few
native English speakers would have trouble determining whether to use
an "I" or a "me."  But throw in someone else and things change.

I'll throw out some possibilities for you.  Judge for yourselves which
are grammatically correct, which sound better, which --you-- would use
and which you might hear a ditch digger say.

I was down at the schoolyard.
Me was down at the schoolyard.
Me and Julio were down at the schoolyard.
Julio and me were down at the schoolyard.
I and Julio were down at the schoolyard.
Julio and I were down at the schoolyard.

He saw me down at the schoolyard.
He saw I down at the schoolyard.
He saw me and Julio down at the schoolyard.
He saw Julio and me down at the schoolyard.
He saw I and Julio down at the schoolyard.
He saw Julio and I down at the schoolyard.


To protect my sanity I'm leaving out what happens if "Julio" is
replaced with a pronoun.

Regards,
    Rick Parker